Monday, September 30, 2013

Men's Qualifications Round-Up: Day 1

As usual, Inside Gym has photo galleries full of guys straddling and grabbing their legs.



What's that? You had to go to be a respectable adult and go to work today? Yeah, me too. Well, here's what we missed, starting with the bad.



Mother Russia falters


The hopes were high for Team Russia. In Valentina Rodionenko's opinion, Emin Garibov, the 2013 European champion on high bar, was the favorite for gold on the event, and Nikolai Kuksenkov, the 2013 Universiades all-around champion, was supposed to challenge him. Well, that's not going to happen…



After 3 subdivisions, Emin Garibov is in 10th place (7.3D/14.866), and Nikolai Kuksenkov is in 40th (6.7D/13.733). Which means that neither gymnast will be in the event finals.

Unfortunately, they're not the only ones who will not compete in the finals. Denis Ablyazin, the 2012 Olympic silver medalist on vault and the 2012 bronze medalist on floor, will not appear in any event finals. According to Blythe's quick hits, the floor just was not big enough for him, as he kept tumbling out of bounds, and he face-planted his first vault: a Kasamatsu double. (His Tsuk double pike was amazing, however. Watch it here.)

The irony here is that Aleksandr Balandin was supposed to be the alternate for the competition. However, of the Russian gymnasts who have competed so far, he's perhaps the most likely to medal at this World Championships. After 3 subdivisions, his 15.600 routine on rings sits in second place.
What is more, Balandin has the chance to up his difficulty in finals. His double layout dismount is only a C.

Also of note: Matvei Petrov is in 4th on pommel horse after 3 subdivisions (6.7D/15.500).


Saturday, September 28, 2013

Men's Podium Training Round-Up: Part 2

Photo via The Guardian

Yang Hak Seon

As the 2011 World champion and the 2012 Olympic champion, Yang is the clear favorite on vault at this year's World Championships. Today, however, he struggled on his namesake: the handspring triple twist. The timing of his block was a little off, which launched him forwards rather than up. The end result: a landing that could rival the world's best long jumpers.

As for Yang's second vault, it's unclear which vault he will perform. In the video from Gymnastike, he did a Kasamatsu 2/1. (For the WAG fans, just think of it as a Tsuk 3/1. In MAG, there's a difference, but don't worry too much about it.)
Notice how Yang landed and then did an extra half twist. That's a sign that he's thinking about throwing a harder vault. Should Yang throw the Kasamatsu 2.5, it would be the first time a gymnast has performed the vault in international competition, and the Yang II would be born in Antwerp. (According to the YouTube page of the Men's Technical Committee, Yang submitted the vault for consideration. This, however, does not mean that Yang will compete the vault.)

As things stand right now, in terms of difficulty, Yang lags behind Ri Se Gwang ever so slightly. Whereas Ri Se Gwang has two 6.4 vaults, Yang Hak Seon has one 6.4 vault and one 6.0 vault. But if he goes for the Kasamatsu 2.5 and lands it, Yang would have two vaults out of a 6.4.

The problem: As far as I know, Yang has not landed the vault in competition this year.


Friday, September 27, 2013

Men's Podium Training Round-Up

Image via IG2' Facebook

My OCD is kicking in. I can't handle the fact that all the videos and articles are scattered across the gymternet.

I need order.

I need organization.

And I'm assuming that some of my readers feel the same way. So, here's a little round-up from today's podium training…


The Latest Roster



Fabian Hambüchen




If only he were wearing his sexy nerd glasses during this interview… Woof…

Fabian admits that he's a little nervous about his new high bar set. Based on the interview, though, it's impossible to tell whether he's referring to the 7.4 routine that he performed at the German National Qualifier or whether he has upgraded even more since then. GAH! Blythe Lawrence, you're never allowed to go to a wedding in England ever again.

Right now, Fabian seems to be the favorite heading into the high bar final–mostly because he doesn't swing around the bar like a wet noodle.

Antwerp by the MAG Eponyms: Part 2




To recap:

OMFG! Have you heard? Victoria Moors is going to perform a double-double layout–a skill that received a preliminary ranking of an "I." OMFG!

Yesterday, all the buzz surrounding Moors got me thinking about the men. I wanted to see just how many of the men's competitors have skills named after them, and well, there's a bunch of them. Many more than I ever expected. So, I had to break my post into two parts. This is part two, focusing on the eponymous skills on vault, p-bar, and high bar. If you want to read about floor, pommels, and rings, click here

Anyhoo, with that out of the way, let's continue to revel in our gym nerddom, shall we?



8. Yang Hak Seon, South Korea – Vault

A handspring triple twist (6.4)

I don't think I can stick a cartwheel anymore. But Yang Hak Seon can almost stick a handspring triple twist.

Getting old tsuks.




9. Ri Se Gwang, North Korea – Vault

Speaking of tsuks, Ri Se Gwang has his own vault named after him: a tsuk double back with a full twist (6.4).


I think that Ri Se Gwang's ankles are going to turn into sawdust one day. Just hopefully not in Antwerp. I want to see a close final between him and Yang.


Thursday, September 26, 2013

Antwerp by the MAG Eponyms: Part 1



OMFG! Have you heard? Victoria Moors is going to perform a double-double layout–a skill that received a preliminary ranking of an "I." OMFG!

All the gymternet buzz this morning got me thinking. On the men's side, a handful of gymnasts every year have skills named after them, but gymnastics nerds rarely fanboy (or fangirl) to the max over the new additions to the MAG Code. This makes it harder to remember all the eponymous skills.

So, during my daily commute, I decided to give myself a test. I tried to list all the eponymous skills in the Code in 10 minutes or less.

Yeah, FAIL. I couldn't do it. Which gave me a momentary identity crisis. If I'm not a diehard gymnastics nerd, what am I?

Trying to salvage my self-image as a gym nerd extraordinaire, I decided to compare this year's nominative list to the Code of Points--just to see how many of this year's male competitors have skills named after them. This is what me and my monogrammed, diamond-encrusted pocket protector found out…


1. Matteo Morandi, Italy – Floor

MAG nerd explanation: A Marinich to one's feet.

Non-MAG-nerd explanation: a handspring front tuck vault, but on the floor. (D)



Honestly, I just think that this is the coolest skills. It reminds me of a time when female gymnasts did "Yurchenkos" off beam.



Monday, September 23, 2013

Women's UTRS: The Best Scores of 2013 Updated September 23



Last year, The All Around created some handy dandy rankings, leading up to the Olympics. This year, not so much. So, I've decided to create the UTRS (Uncle Tim Ranking System), which, for those who care, is pronounced "uterus." Think of my ranking system as a surrogate until The All Around steps in and takes over.

As per usual, take these rankings with a grain of salt. (Pro Tip: Never bet your life savings based on my numbers–or my predictions for that matter.) Judging varies from meet to meet, and as you can see, I've culled these scores from several meets. I've included the competition names so that you can decide how much crack the judges smoked before handing out the scores.

More than anything, you should think of these tables like this: New quad, new Code of Points. What the H is a good score nowadays? Well, let me show you…

Key:

  • Bold Face: An update since the last iteration of the UTRS.
  • An asterisk (*): Usually denotes a routine for which I have a final score without a D score.
  • Links, when available, are provided for the top 5 routines.


Women's All-Around Rankings: Best Scores



Name
Country
Score
Meet
1. Simone BilesUSA60.500U.S. Nationals
1. Kyla RossUSA60.500U.S. Nationals
3. Aliya MustafinaRussia59.850Russian Nationals
4. Giulia SteingruberSwitzerland59.400Swiss Championships
5. Katelyn OhashiUSA59.199American Cup
6. Larisa IordacheRomania58.550Romanian Nationals
7. Brenna DowellUSA58.450U.S. Nationals
8. Peyton ErnstUSA58.250Secret Classic
9. Roxana PopaSpain58.083Spanish Nationals
10. Anastasia GrishinaRussia57.932European Championships
11. Yao JinnanChina57.801Chinese National Games
11. Shang ChunsongChina57.801Chinese National Games
13. Maggie NicholsUSA57.750U.S. Nationals
14. Mykayla SkinnerUSA57.700U.S. Nationals
15. Vanessa FerrariItaly57.600German-Italian Friendly



Best D Scores of the Top 15 All-Arounders


NameCountryScoreMeet
1. Simone BilesUSA24.9Jesolo
2. Katelyn OhashiUSA24.6American Cup
3. Mykayla SkinnerUSA24.5Secret Classic
4. Brenna DowellUSA24.2Secret Classic
5. Aliya MustafinaRussia24.0European Championships
5. Peyton ErnstUSA24.0U.S. Nationals
5. Shang ChunsongChina24.0Chinese National Games
8. Giulia SteingruberSwitzerland23.9Swiss Championships
8. Kyla RossUSA23.9U.S. Nationals
8. Larisa IordacheRomania23.9European Championships
11. Anastasia GrishinaRussia23.8European Championships
11. Yao JinnanChina23.8Chinese National Games
13. Roxana PopaSpain23.5Spanish Nationals
14. Maggie NicholsUSA23.4Secret Classic
15. Vanessa FerrariItaly22.7American Cup
Please note: First, many of these gymnasts did not post their best all-around scores with the D scores listed above. For example, when Simone Biles scored a 60.500, her total difficulty amounted to 24.3. When Mykayla scored her 57.700, her total difficulty amounted to 23.9. Second, this data is limited. For instance, I do not have D scores for Aliya's routines from Russian Nationals, and during the European Championships, D scores were not listed during the all-around finals.


Men's UTRS: The Best Scores of 2013 Updated September 23

Team Italia!


Last year, the All Around created some handy dandy rankings, leading up to the Olympics. This year, not so much. So, I've decided to create the UTRS (Uncle Tim Ranking System), which, for those who care, is pronounced "uterus." Think of my ranking system as a surrogate until The All Around steps in and takes over.

As per usual, take these rankings with a grain of salt. (Pro Tip: Never bet your life savings based on my numbers–or my predictions for that matter.) Judging varies from meet to meet, and as you can see, I've culled these scores from several meets. I've included the competition names so that you can decide how much crack the judges smoked before handing out the scores.

More than anything, you should think of these tables like this: New quad, new Code of Points. What the H is a good score nowadays? Well, let me show you…

Key:

  • Bold Face: An update since the last iteration of the UTRS.
  • An asterisk (*): Usually denotes a routine for which I have a final score without a D score.
  • Links, when available, are provided for the top 5 routines.
  • Parentheses ( ): The U.S. Nationals used a peculiar bonus system. (See image at the bottom.) Even though start value bonus was not in effect, the execution bonus was added to the D score. To the best of my ability, I have adjusted the scores for the U.S. men on the individual apparatus. However, I have not had time to adjust their all-around scores. Consequently, the U.S. men's all-around scores have parentheses around them. 
  • Many, many, many thanks to Chinese Gymnastics Tumblr for their help with the transliteration of names!!


Men's All-Around Rankings: Best Scores





NameCountryScoreMeet
1. Kohei Uchimura
(内村航平)
Japan91.850Japanese Nationals
2. Sam MikulakUSA(91.650)U.S. Nationals
3. Max WhitlockGreat Britain90.650British Championships
4. Alexander NaddourUSA(90.600)U.S. Nationals
5. Oleg Verniaiev
(Олег Верняєв)
Ukraine90.500University Games
6. John OrozcoUSA(90.400)U.S. Nationals
7. Zhou Shixiong
(周施雄)
China90.269Chinese National Games
8. Ryohei Kato
(加藤凌平)
Japan90.250University Games
9. Liu Rongbing
(刘榕冰)
China90.135Chinese National Games
10. Oleg Stepko
(Олег Степко)
Ukraine90.050University Games
11. Deng Shudi
(邓书弟)
China90.035Chinese National Games
12. Cheng Ran
(程然)
China89.969Chinese National Games
13. Nikolai Kuksenkov
(Николай Куксенков)
Russia89.950University Games
14. Fabian HambuechenGermany89.850University Games
15. David Belyavskiy
(Давид Белявский)
Russia89.799European Championships


Best D Scores of the Top 15 All-Arounders

(Excluding the Americans. See note above.)


NameCountryScoreMeet
1. Kohei Uchimura
(内村航平)
Japan38.8Japanese Nationals
2. Deng Shudi
(邓书弟)
China38.6Chinese National Games
2. Oleg Verniaiev
(Олег Верняєв)
Ukraine38.6University Games
4. Zhou Shixiong
(周施雄)
China38.5Chinese National Games
5. Cheng Ran
(程然)
China38.2Chinese National Games
6. Ryohei Kato
(加藤凌平)
Japan38.1Tokyo Cup
7. Liu Rongbing
(刘榕冰)
China37.6Chinese National Games
8. Max WhitlockGreat Britain37.3Westminster Cup
9. Oleg Stepko
(Олег Степко)
Ukraine37.2European Championships
10. Fabian HambuechenGermany37.1German World Qualifier
11. David Belyavskiy
(Давид Белявский)
Russia37.0European Championships
12. Nikolai Kuksenkov
(Николай Куксенков)
Russia36.7University Games
Please note: This is meant to give you a general idea. The data I have is limited. For instance, I do not have D scores the all-around finals at the European Championships.

Saturday, September 21, 2013

Fact Checking Bruno Grandi: Is 18 Old?



In his latest interview, Bruno Grandi said:

"Secondly, the great drama of our sport is the age question. If you rob a female athlete of all hope of ever making the national team when she is just 13 or 14, if 18-year-olds are considered old – and there are only a few exceptions – what hope is there?"

Sometimes, listening to Bruno Grandi is like listening to Salvador Dalí. It's a surrealist experience during which you never know quite what he's saying, but it all sounds important. Amidst his latest gobbledygook, I managed to grasp one idea: 18 is old.

Which surprised me because the gymternet has been inundated with talk about old farts. Last year, Dvora Meyers wrote an article for the Atlantic called "The Rise (and Fall?) of the Little Girl Gymnast," and there's a website dedicated entirely to adult gymnastics. Plus, Oksana Chusovitina has become a veritable gymternet hero. Everything seems to be telling me that 18 is not old!

But maybe my perception has been warped. Maybe I have been drinking the old fart Kool-Aid (AKA pinot grigio). Maybe 18 is old after all.

With my interest piqued, I decided to make some spreadsheets. 'Cause that's what normal people do when their boyfriends are away for the weekend, right? They fact check Bruno Grandi on their Saturday evenings.

Hmm… I need a new hobby…


Friday, September 20, 2013

Does the Road to Rio Start in Antwerp?



"The throwaway Worlds."

That's what many have called the post-Olympics Worlds (henceforth, POW). With the past Olympics still fresh in our minds and with the next Olympics still so far away, the competition just seems so inconsequential.

Nevertheless, there are those entities that think that every competition of this quadrennium is important. Chief among them is the Daily Mail. In an attempt to capitalize on the post-London buzz, the newspaper has created an entire series called the Road to Rio. No offense to Max Whitlock, but every time I read one of those headlines, I roll my eyes so hard it hurts, and then, I mutter, "Rio's three years away."

But once the initial snark subsided, though, my curiosity, I'll admit, did get the best of me. I wanted to know just how many POW medalists find themselves on the podium at the next Olympics. At first, I wanted to know just because, but after reading about Bruno Grandi's latest round of proposals in the works, I felt even more pressure to crunch some numbers.

Armed with my diamond-encrusted, monogrammed pocket protector, I made some spreadsheets for the ladies and the gents, and here's what I found.


Friday, September 13, 2013

MAG: Will 2013 be the Year of the Unicorn?



On Wednesday, I wrote a post responding to the gymternet grumblers--those women's gymnastics fans who constantly weep for a utopian past when women's gymnastics had some kind of continuity and the post-Olympics year wasn't such a bummer.

As of right now, those grumblings are not taking place on the men's side. Perhaps it's because MAG fans tend to be a little older, a little wiser. Perhaps it's because, generally speaking, a male gymnast's career lasts longer than that of a female gymnast. Perhaps it's because, as I'm writing this, 5 of the 7 Olympic champions are confirmed to compete at the World Championships.

Indeed, right now, men's gymnastics fans have the luxury of hope on their side. In Antwerp, it's possible that we will see some of the Olympic champions win yet again. But just how often does that happen?


Wednesday, September 11, 2013

WAG: Understanding the Post-Olympics Letdown



The grumbling began last September.

"Why are the American gymnasts doing the Kellogg's Tour? Everyone should be like Kyla, and everyone should be back in the gym! These girls are never going to make it to Worlds. Never."

The Hyperbolic Negative Nancys and Negative Nathans weren't exactly correct. Besides Kyla, one American gymnast did return to competition this year. Despite her yucky injury, McKayla Maroney looks poised to win a vault medal and possibly a floor medal. The other three members of the Fierce Five… Aly, Jordyn, and Gabby… yeah, no.

Thankfully, the rest of the gymnastics world carried on. Having given up hope on the majority of the Fierce Five, gymnastics fans were eager to cheer on Olympic medalists like Ksenia Afanasyeva and Viktoria Komova. But then, Awful August happened. Suddenly, Ksenia Afanasyeva was out with an ankle injury, and Viktoria Komova came down with a nasty illness of some sort.

And so, with the injuries and illnesses piling up, gymnastics fans are exasperated. "This World Championships is going to suck. Might as well put an asterisk next to the names already."

Well, friends, guess what. The Post-Olympics World Championships usually do suck, but they only suck for those who have the wrong expectations…


Monday, September 9, 2013

Women's UTRS: The Best Scores of 2013 Updated September 9

Redemption?


Last year, The All Around created some handy dandy rankings, leading up to the Olympics. This year, not so much. So, I've decided to create the UTRS (Uncle Tim Ranking System), which, for those who care, is pronounced "uterus." Think of my ranking system as a surrogate until The All Around steps in and takes over.

As per usual, take these rankings with a grain of salt. (Pro Tip: Never bet your life savings based on my numbers–or my predictions for that matter.) Judging varies from meet to meet, and as you can see, I've culled these scores from several meets. I've included the competition names so that you can decide how much crack the judges smoked before handing out the scores.

More than anything, you should think of these tables like this: New quad, new Code of Points. What the H is a good score nowadays? Well, let me show you…

Key:

  • Bold Face: An update since the last iteration of the UTRS.
  • An asterisk (*): Usually denotes a routine for which I have a final score without a D score.
  • Links, when available, are provided for the top 5 routines.


Women's All-Around Rankings: Best Scores



Name
Country
Score
Meet
1. Simone BilesUSA60.500U.S. Nationals
1. Kyla RossUSA60.500U.S. Nationals
3. Aliya MustafinaRussia59.850Russian Nationals
4. Giulia SteingruberSwitzerland59.400Swiss Championships
5. Katelyn OhashiUSA59.199American Cup
6. Larisa IordacheRomania58.550Romanian Nationals
7. Brenna DowellUSA58.450U.S. Nationals
8. Peyton ErnstUSA58.250Secret Classic
9. Roxana PopaSpain58.083Spanish Nationals
10. Anastasia GrishinaRussia57.932European Championships
11. Yao JinnanChina57.801Chinese National Games
11. Shang ChunsongChina57.801Chinese National Games
13. Maggie NicholsUSA57.750U.S. Nationals
14. Mykayla SkinnerUSA57.700U.S. Nationals
15. Diana BulimarRomania57.533Dutch Friendly



Best D Scores of the Top 15 All-Arounders


NameCountryScoreMeet
1. Simone BilesUSA24.9Jesolo
2. Katelyn OhashiUSA24.6American Cup
3. Mykayla SkinnerUSA24.5Secret Classic
4. Brenna DowellUSA24.2Secret Classic
5. Aliya MustafinaRussia24.0European Championships
5. Peyton ErnstUSA24.0U.S. Nationals
5. Shang ChunsongChina24.0Chinese National Games
8. Giulia SteingruberSwitzerland23.9Swiss Championships
8. Kyla RossUSA23.9U.S. Nationals
8. Larisa IordacheRomania23.9European Championships
11. Anastasia GrishinaRussia23.8European Championships
11. Yao JinnanChina23.8Chinese National Games
13. Roxana PopaSpain23.5Spanish Nationals
14. Maggie NicholsUSA23.4Secret Classic
15. Diana BulimarRomania23.0Dutch Friendly
Please note: First, many of these gymnasts did not post their best all-around scores with the D scores listed above. For example, when Simone Biles scored a 60.500, her total difficulty amounted to 24.3. When Mykayla scored her 57.700, her total difficulty amounted to 23.9. Second, this data is limited. For instance, I do not have D scores for Aliya's routines from Russian Nationals, and during the European Championships, D scores were not listed during the all-around finals.


Men's UTRS: The Best Scores of 2013 Updated September 9

He's baaaaaaack!

Last year, the All Around created some handy dandy rankings, leading up to the Olympics. This year, not so much. So, I've decided to create the UTRS (Uncle Tim Ranking System), which, for those who care, is pronounced "uterus." Think of my ranking system as a surrogate until The All Around steps in and takes over.

As per usual, take these rankings with a grain of salt. (Pro Tip: Never bet your life savings based on my numbers–or my predictions for that matter.) Judging varies from meet to meet, and as you can see, I've culled these scores from several meets. I've included the competition names so that you can decide how much crack the judges smoked before handing out the scores.

More than anything, you should think of these tables like this: New quad, new Code of Points. What the H is a good score nowadays? Well, let me show you…

Key:

  • Bold Face: An update since the last iteration of the UTRS.
  • An asterisk (*): Usually denotes a routine for which I have a final score without a D score.
  • Links, when available, are provided for the top 5 routines.
  • Parentheses ( ): The U.S. Nationals used a peculiar bonus system. (See image at the bottom.) Even though start value bonus was not in effect, the execution bonus was added to the D score. To the best of my ability, I have adjusted the scores for the U.S. men on the individual apparatus. However, I have not had time to adjust their all-around scores. Consequently, the U.S. men's all-around scores have parentheses around them. 
  • Many, many, many thanks to Chinese Gymnastics Tumblr for their help with the transliteration of names!!


Men's All-Around Rankings: Best Scores




NameCountryScoreMeet
1. Kohei Uchimura
(内村航平)
Japan91.850Japanese Nationals
2. Sam MikulakUSA(91.650)U.S. Nationals
3. Max WhitlockGreat Britain90.650British Championships
4. Alexander NaddourUSA(90.600)U.S. Nationals
5. Oleg Verniaiev
(Олег Верняєв)
Ukraine90.500University Games
6. John OrozcoUSA(90.400)U.S. Nationals
7. Zhou Shixiong
(周施雄)
China90.269Chinese National Games
8. Ryohei Kato
(加藤凌平)
Japan90.250University Games
9. Liu Rongbing
(刘榕冰)
China90.135Chinese National Games
10. Oleg Stepko
(Олег Степко)
Ukraine90.050University Games
11. Deng Shudi
(邓书弟)
China90.035Chinese National Games
12. Cheng Ran
(程然)
China89.969Chinese National Games
13. Nikolai Kuksenkov
(Николай Куксенков)
Russia89.950University Games
14. Fabian HambuechenGermany89.850University Games
15. David Belyavskiy
(Давид Белявский)
Russia89.799European Championships


Best D Scores of the Top 15 All-Arounders

(Excluding the Americans. See note above.)


NameCountryScoreMeet
1. Kohei Uchimura
(内村航平)
Japan38.8Japanese Nationals
2. Deng Shudi
(邓书弟)
China38.6Chinese National Games
2. Oleg Verniaiev
(Олег Верняєв)
Ukraine38.6University Games
4. Zhou Shixiong
(周施雄)
China38.5Chinese National Games
5. Cheng Ran
(程然)
China38.2Chinese National Games
6. Ryohei Kato
(加藤凌平)
Japan38.1Tokyo Cup
7. Liu Rongbing
(刘榕冰)
China37.6Chinese National Games
8. Max WhitlockGreat Britain37.3Westminster Cup
9. Oleg Stepko
(Олег Степко)
Ukraine37.2European Championships
10. Fabian HambuechenGermany37.1German World Qualifier
11. David Belyavskiy
(Давид Белявский)
Russia37.0European Championships
12. Nikolai Kuksenkov
(Николай Куксенков)
Russia36.7University Games
Please note: This is meant to give you a general idea. The data I have is limited. For instance, I do not have D scores the all-around finals at the European Championships.

Friday, September 6, 2013

2006 and beyond: Just Shy of a World Medal


Name every World Championship gold medalist since 2006!

Ready…

Set…

Go!



Okay, that wasn't too bad, was it? Now name every gymnast who finished fourth at the World Championships since 2006…

Ready…

Set…

Oh, crud. If you're anything like me, your list is embarrassingly short.

Seriously, I'm ashamed of my list. Over the years, many great gymnasts have finished fourth. In fact, as you look at the tables below, you'll recognize the majority of their names. It's just, well, on that particular day, they fell short of the podium.

This post is my tribute to those guys and gals whose performances have been largely forgotten by the gymternet. This post, more specifically, is dedicated to the gymnasts who were less than 0.1 away from a medal.

Who are those almost medalists? Let's start with the ladies…


Wednesday, September 4, 2013

2006 and beyond: The Margins of Victory in WAG



For a statistician, the open-ended scoring system tuckin' tsuks.

With a rule book that changed every four years, it was already difficult to compare scores from one quad to the next. Now, it's almost impossible to compare scores from the 10.0 era with the post-2006 era.

In the past, many World champions outscored their opponents by hundredths of a point. (Or by one thousandth of a point if you're Chellsie Memmel during the all-around final in 2005) Now, gymnasts typically win by several tenths. Here's a little comparison:


Event
Average Margin of Victory:
2006-7, 2009-11

(The last 5 Worlds under the 10.0)
Average Margin of Victory:
2006-7, 2009-11

(The first 5 Worlds under the New Code)
All-Around
0.143
0.528
Vault
0.095
0.355
Bars
0.045
0.392
Beam
0.107
0.218
Floor
0.092
0.117
For the math nerds, I checked for outliers using 1.5•IQR

With the exception of floor, there's a noticeable difference. Yes, winning by hundredths still happens in the world of women's artistic gymnastics, but without a finite number of points and without a 0.05 deduction, it's no longer the norm. As I said yesterday, I believe that it's time to reset the record books for the World Championships. Below you'll find the largest margins of victory and the smallest margins of victory under the new scoring system.


Tuesday, September 3, 2013

2006 and beyond: The Margins of Victory in MAG



For a statistician, the open-ended scoring system tuckin' tsuks.

With a rule book that changed every four years, it was already difficult to compare scores from one quad to the next. Now, it's almost impossible to compare scores from the 10.0 era with the post-2006 era. The margins of victory have changed too much.

In the past, many World champions outscored their opponents by hundredths of a point. Now, gymnasts typically win by several tenths. Here's a little comparison:



Event
Average Margin of Victory:
1999, 2001-3, 2005

(The last 5 Worlds under the 10.0)
Average Margin of Victory:
2006-7, 2009-11

(The first 5 Worlds under the new system)
All-Around
0.412
2.132
Floor
0.050
0.125
Pommels
0.052
0.333
Rings
0.050
0.155
Vault
0.110
0.142
P-Bars
0.043
0.155
High Bar
0.027
0.237
For the math nerds, I checked for outliers using 1.5•IQR.

With the exception of vault, there's a noticeable difference. Yes, winning by hundredths still happens in the world of men's artistic gymnastics, but without a finite number of points and without a 0.05 deduction, it's no longer the norm. So, perhaps it's time to reset the record books for the World Championships. Below you'll find the largest margins of victory and the smallest margins of victory under the new scoring system.