Thursday, August 29, 2013

2006 and beyond: The Top Nations in WAG

At one point in history, Romanians danced like this

and the Americans were lucky if they won a World medal against the "red army" of the Soviet Union and, to a lesser degree, East Germany.

Now, neither the Soviet Union nor East Germany exists. Arm waving is dancing. And Tumblr would have a meltdown if the U.S. didn't win a medal at a World Championships.

Since the open-ended scoring system was adopted in 2006, American gymnasts have been the team to beat. It doesn't really matter how you look at the numbers. You can look at total medal count…

Wednesday, August 28, 2013

2006 and beyond: The Top Nations in MAG

No matter how you present the statistics, the Chinese men have dominated the past 5 World Artistic Gymnastics Championships. They were the gymnastics equivalent of the Dream Team.

(Team competition counts as 1 medal)

Tuesday, August 27, 2013

2006 and beyond: The Best WAG Gymnasts

Since 2006, the FIG has handed out a total of 149 World Championship medals to the ladies. Ostensibly, these medals have been given to the best gymnasts in the world. As I pointed out yesterday, the new Code of Points explicitly seeks to assure "the identification of the best gymnast in any competition." Under the perfect-10 system, this goal, if it was a goal, was never stated. (In 1997, for instance, the Code strove to "ensure the most objective as possible evaluation of the exercises.")

So, it begs the question: Have the best gymnasts been identified at the World Championships? Once again, I'm not going to go final by final, disputing whether the best gymnasts ended up on the podium. I'm sure that we all can think of a time when one of our favorite gymnasts was "robbed." But when we step back and look at the big picture, do the statistics seem to reflect who were the top gymnasts in the world?

Let's take a look…

Here are the women who have won the most World Championship medals, regardless of color:

Monday, August 26, 2013

2006 and beyond: Is the New Scoring System Selecting the Best Male Gymnasts?

Remember the 10.0 system? Wasn't it perfect?

The 2013 World Championships in Antwerp will be the sixth World Championships under the open-ended scoring system. Over the system's short lifespan, many have criticized it, positing that it has killed artistry, that it has rendered the sport too confusing for the layperson, that it has mangled execution, among other things.

Few have discussed whether the new system has achieved its own goals, though. If you've read the Code carefully, you know that the new scoring system is supposed to rank the athletes correctly. As the current Code states, its purpose is to "assure the identification of the best gymnast in any competition." This line was new to the open-ended Code. During the perfect 10 era, this may have been an implicit goal of the men's Code of Points, but it was not listed explicitly as one of the purposes of the Code.

So, as we look back on the past five World Championships, has the Code of Points done its job? In this post, I'm not going to go final by final, disputing whether the best gymnasts ended up on the podium. I'm sure that we all can think of a time when one of our favorite gymnasts was "robbed." But when step back and look at the big picture, do the statistics seem to reflect who are the top gymnasts in the world?

Here's who has won the most medals, regardless of color:

Thursday, August 22, 2013

P&G Championships Number Love: The Gentlemen

Unless you love drama, don't fall in love with the U.S. men's gymnastics team. The last 96 hours of my life have been like a telenovela, but without the cheating husband and love triangles. First, Jake Dalton fell on parallel bars. Then, Sam Mikulak fell twice on pommel horse. Then, Danell Leyva was on the team. Then, he wasn't. And now, John Orozco is the sixth member.

It has been exhausting.

In these turbulent gymnastics times, I turn to my spreadsheets because numbers are my Xanax. Here's what I've found…



Most Improved Senior Elite goes to…




Tuesday, August 20, 2013

P&G Championships Number Love: The Ladies

I like spreadsheets about as much as I like Ferrari leaps. That's not saying a whole lot. Nevertheless, there seem to be an abundance of opinions and a paucity of statistics on the gymternet. And we, gymnastics fans, need to change that. So, let's get started, shall we? I promise to make this as painless as possible.

First up, how did the 2012 senior all-arounders fare in 2013?

Don't you love spreadsheets? A bunch of numbers and a bunch of blank spaces. No explanations. Well, here's what I take away from that spreadsheet:

1. Stripper poles.

Ah, those empty spaces at the top. We're still waiting for those much-hyped comebacks. In the meantime, we get to see how these girls fare in Hollywood. While Gabby was telling me not to text and drive and while Jordyn Wieber was starring in TumblTrak commercials, Aly Raisman was working the pole on national television.

Good on ya, Aly! I would not have had the guts to do that, and Lord knows America wouldn't vote for me if I wore that outfit and danced on a pole. As my boyfriend once told me, "You have a good face for radio."


2. Stuck in the middle with you: Not only is that the title of a great song, but it's a pretty apt description of what happens every four years. With every batch of elites, one gymnast consistently finishes seventh or eighth. It's a terrible spot to be in. Unless you're really, really good on individual apparatuses, Marta is going to overlook you for the big teams. Eighth last year and seventh this year, Kennedy Baker seems to be the gymnast stuck in the middle.

In order to get out of that position, Kennedy's going to need to upgrade (as well as improve her execution). Her Patterson dismount was a start at Championships.



3. MyKayla Skinner, Most Improved Gymnast: Yes, the same girl who brought us this

 and this
(via Spanny's Big Fake Tumblr)

has improved. A LOT. In fact, I'd venture to say that she is the most improved member of the Senior National Team. She went from being almost last at the 2012 Nationals to being middle of the pack at the 2013 Nationals.

But, but, but… There has been some turnover in the elite scene. The 2012 stars like Gabby Douglas and Jordyn Wieber were not present at the 2013 P&G Championships. But, but but… the Code of Points has changed between 2012 and 2013.

Yes, I know that. Even this elite season, she has improved. A LOT.
Yes, you read that chart correctly. With more or less the same group of judges, Mykayla Skinner bettered her all-around score by 4.700 points in a matter of 21 days. Please take a moment to wrap your mind around that.

Now, please don't misconstrue what I'm saying. I'm not saying that Skinner's the second coming of Nadia. I see her as having potential to become a Kristen Maloney of sorts (without the tibia rod, hopefully). All I'm saying is this: I believe in giving credit where credit is due, and an improvement by 4+ points by any gymnast deserves some acknowledgement.

Sunday, August 18, 2013

Men's UTRS: The Best Scores of 2013 Updated August 18


Last year, The All Around created some handy dandy rankings, leading up to the Olympics. This year, not so much. So, I've decided to create the UTRS (Uncle Tim Ranking System), which, for those who care, is pronounced "uterus." Think of my ranking system as a surrogate until The All Around steps in and takes over.

As per usual, take these rankings with a grain of salt. (Pro Tip: Never bet your life savings based on my numbers–or my predictions for that matter.) Judging varies from meet to meet, and as you can see, I've culled these scores from several meets. I've included the competition names so that you can decide how much crack the judges smoked before handing out the scores.

More than anything, you should think of these tables like this: New quad, new Code of Points. What the H is a good score nowadays? Well, let me show you…

Key:

  • Bold Face: An update since the last iteration of the UTRS.
  • An asterisk (*): Usually denotes a routine for which I have a final score without a D score.
  • A parentheses ( ): Marks scores from the U.S. Qualifier and the P&G Championships (U.S. Nationals). I'm marking them because U.S. men had an execution bonus system in place during their Nationals, which may mean that some final scores are inflated. (See details at the bottom of this post.)
  • Links, when available, are provided for the top 5 routines.
  • These rankings do not include scores from the Russian Cup.



Men's All-Around Rankings: Best Scores
NameCountryScoreMeet
1. Kohei Uchimura
(内村航平)
Japan91.850Japanese Nationals
2. Sam MikulakUSA(91.650)U.S. Nationals
3. Max WhitlockGreat Britain90.650British Championships
4. Alex NaddourUSA(90.600)U.S. Nationals
5. Oleg Verniaiev
(Олег Верняєв)
Ukraine90.500University Games
6. John OrozcoUSA(90.400)U.S. Nationals
7. Ryohei Kato
(加藤凌平)
Japan90.250University Games
8. Oleg StepkoUkraine90.050University Games
9. Nikolai KuksenkovRussia89.950University Games
10. Fabian HambuechenGermany89.850University Games
11. David Belyavskiy
(Давид Белявский)
Russia89.799European Championships
12. Jake DaltonUSA89.398American Cup
13. Daniel PurvisGreat Britain89.250Tokyo World Cup
14. Liu RongbingChina89.134Chinese Nationals
15. Kazuhito TanakaJapan89.100NHK Cup


Men's Floor Rankings: Best D Scores


NameCountryD-ScoreMeet
1. Shirai Kenzo
(白井健三)
Japan7.3Japanese Nationals
2. Denis Ablyazin
(Аблязин Денис)
Russia7.1University Games
3. Flavius KocziRomania7.0European Championships
4. Steven LegendreUSA6.9U.S. Nationals
5. Ryohei Kato
(加藤凌平)
Japan6.8Tokyo World Cup
5. Eddie PenevUSA6.8U.S. Nationals
5. Jake DaltonUSA6.8U.S. Nationals
8. Oleg Verniaiev
(Олег Верняєв)
Ukraine6.7Tokyo World Cup
8. Sergio SasakiBrazil6.7Tokyo World Cup
8. Kohei Uchimura
(内村航平)
Japan6.7Japanese Nationals
8. Diego HypólitoBrazil6.7Pan Ams
8. Stacey ErvinUSA6.7U.S. Nationals
8. Paul RuggeriUSA6.7U.S. Nationals
14. Max WhitlockGreat Britain6.6European Championships
14. Matthias FahrigGermany6.6European Championships
14. Jeffrey WammesNetherlands6.6European Championships
14. Jossimar Calvo MorenoColombia6.6Pan Ams

Men's Floor Rankings: Best Scores


NameCountryFinal ScoreMeet
1. Jake DaltonUSA(16.100)U.S. Nationals
2. Shirai Kenzo
(白井健三)
Japan15.900All-Japan Championships
2. Steven LegendreUSA(15.900)U.S. Nationals
4. Kohei Uchimura
(内村航平)
Japan15.800NHK Cup
4. Eddie PenevUSA(15.800)U.S. Nationals
4. Paul RuggeriUSA(15.800)U.S. Nationals
7. Stacey ErvinUSA(15.750)U.S. Nationals
8. Diego HypólitoUSA15.700Pan Ams
9. Adrian de los AngelesUSA15.650Winter Cup
9. Denis AblyazinRussia15.650University Games
11. Manrique LarduetCuba15.525Pan Ams
12. Max WhitlockGreat Britain15.500European Championships
12. Ryohei Kato
(加藤凌平)
Japan15.500University Games
12. Sam MikulakUSA(15.500)U.S. Nationals
15. David Belyavskiy
(Давид Белявский)
Russia15.433European Championships

Women's UTRS: Best Scores of 2013 Updated August 18


Last year, The All Around created some handy dandy rankings, leading up to the Olympics. This year, not so much. So, I've decided to create the UTRS (Uncle Tim Ranking System), which, for those who care, is pronounced "uterus." Think of my ranking system as a surrogate until The All Around steps in and takes over.

As per usual, take these rankings with a grain of salt. (Pro Tip: Never bet your life savings based on my numbers–or my predictions for that matter.) Judging varies from meet to meet, and as you can see, I've culled these scores from several meets. I've included the competition names so that you can decide how much crack the judges smoked before handing out the scores.

More than anything, you should think of these tables like this: New quad, new Code of Points. What the H is a good score nowadays? Well, let me show you…

Key:

  • Bold Face: An update since the last iteration of the UTRS.
  • An asterisk (*): Usually denotes a routine for which I have a final score without a D score.
  • Links, when available, are provided for the top 5 routines.
  • Scores from the Russian Cup have not been included

Women's All-Around Rankings: Best Scores

NameCountryScoreMeet
1. Simone BilesUSA60.500U.S. Nationals
1. Kyla RossUSA60.500U.S. Nationals
3. Aliya MustafinaRussia59.850Russian Nationals
4. Katelyn OhashiUSA59.199American Cup
5. Brenna DowellUSA58.450U.S. Nationals
6. Larisa IordacheRomania58.432European Championships
7. Peyton ErnstUSA58.250Secret Classic
8. Roxana PopaSpain58.083Spanish Nationals
9. Anastasia GrishinaRussia57.932European Championships
10. Maggie NicholsUSA57.750U.S. Nationals
11. Mykayla SkinnerUSA57.700U.S. Nationals
12. Yao JinnanChina57.468Chinese Nationals
13. Victoria MoorsCanada57.400Comaneci International
14. Yevgenia ShelgunovaRussia57.250Russian Nationals
15. Diana BulimarRomania57.065European Championships
15. Giulia SteingruberSwitzerland57.065European Championships



Women's Vault Rankings: Best D Score Averages
In other words, who has the most scoring potential? 


NameCountryD 1D 2D Avg.Meet
1. Hong Un JongNorth Korea6.36.46.35Universiades
2. McKayla MaroneyUSA6.36.06.15Secret Classic
3. Mykayla SkinnerUSA6.45.86.1Secret Classic
3. Fadwa MahmoudEgypt7.05.26.1Mediterranean Games
3. Ri Un HaNorth Korea5.86.46.1Doha
3. Ellie BlackCanada6.26.06.1Universiades
3. Alexa Moreno MedinaMexico6.26.06.1Universiades
8. Phan Thi Ha ThanhVietnam5.86.26.0Doha
9. Simone BilesUSA6.35.65.95Jesolo
9. Maria PasekaRussia6.35.65.95Europeans
9. Ksenia AfanasyevaRussia6.35.65.95Universiades
12. Dovelis TorresCuba5.85.75.75Pan Ams
13. Giulia SteingruberSwitzerland6.25.25.7Europeans
13. Jade BarbosaBrazil5.85.65.7Anadia
13. Alla SosnitskayaRussia5.85.65.7Anadia



Women's Vault Rankings: Best Avg. Scores


NameCountryFinal ScoreMeet
1. McKayla MaroneyUSA15.700U.S. Nationals
2. Simone BilesUSA15.475U.S. Nationals
3. Hong Un JongNorth Korea15.125Universiades
3. Ksenia AfanasyevaRussia15.125Universiades
5. Maria PasekaRussia14.950Universiades
6. Oksana ChusovitinaUzbekistan14.887Cottbus
7. Mykayla SkinnerUSA14.875Secret Classic
8. Ellie BlackCanada14.862Universiades
9. Phan Thi Ha Thanh Vietnam14.825Doha
9. Jade BarbosaBrazil14.825Anadia
11. Giulia SteingruberSwitzerland14.783Europeans
12. Larisa IordacheRomania14.675Doha
12. Alexa Moreno MedinaMexico14.675Universiades
12. Dovelis TorresCuba14.675Pan Ams

Tuesday, August 13, 2013

Sloshed: The 2013 P&G Championships Drinking Game



1. The broadcast will open with Olympics fluff. Waterfall drink throughout.

2. If you're not already sloshed from drinking for 2 minutes straight, take a sip of a Caiparinha every time the commentators mention Rio. If you're feeling snarky, mutter, "Fools, the Olympics are more than 1,000 days away. Stop talking about 2016."

3. Whenever Nastia Liukin speaks, pound a White Russian, turn to the poster of Svetlana Boginskaya on your wall, and yell, "IT WAS A DELTCHEV!"


Wednesday, August 7, 2013

Your P&G Championships Cheat Sheet: The All-Around

I can't understand why USAG didn't use the Charmin bear's sparkly butt as the logo for this event.


Kyle Shewfelt once said, "The thing about the year after the Olympics is that you really don’t need to be that great." Unfortunately, I suspect that those words will ring true in Hartford, Connecticut. By that, I mean we will see several great performances, but no single all-arounder will deliver panty-dropping routines across all 6 events. That said, I'm sure that many viewers, males and females alike, will be fighting the urge to take off their panties and fling them at their televisions. If American male gymnasts have one thing going for them, it's the hotness level.

With that disclaimer out of the way, let's take a look at my rankings of the boys…


1. Sam Mikulak



Oh, Sam, I pray to the gym gods every night on your behalf, and somehow, you still injure yourself. In the fall, Sam tore a muscle in his left calf, which prevented him from competing all-around for most of the collegiate season. But by April, he was back at it and won the all-around at the NCAA Championships with a score of 91.150. (The NCAA's scoring system is slightly different. They have a stick bonus, for instance.)

Shortly thereafter, Sam competed at the FIG Challenge Cup in Anadia, Portugal. Still competing slightly watered down routines, he did not receive scores that would qualify him for event finals at the World Championships. But he did take home bronze on floor (15.100) and gold on high bar (15.275).

Make It or Break It Routine: The place where Sam can really screw the pooch is on rings. As most hardcore gym fans know, it's one of his weaker events, but he has worked to improve it. Since last year, he has added two Maltese crosses to the routine, but during the NCAA season, they often looked like Maltlanches (somewhere between a Maltese and a planche). Starting off high, he slowly lowers his shoulders into the Maltese. We'll have to see how picky the American judges are… My guess: Not too picky.

Panty Dropper Routine: Parallel bars. Setting aside his muscled peach half (at the 0:22 mark), Sam's parallel bars are glorious. He takes everything as high as possible. His Sasaki (straddle 5/4 at the 0:36 mark) is stratospheric, and when he catches it at the last minute, he gives you a mini heart attack that ends in a swoon. He also shows shades of Li Xiaoshuang when he hops on his giant to handstand (at the 0:42 mark).


High Score of 2013: N/A
Low Score of 2013: N/A
Related: GymCastic's Interview with Sam Mikulak