Sunday, July 28, 2013

Men's UTRS: Best Scores of 2013 Updated July 28


Last year, The All Around created some handy dandy rankings, leading up to the Olympics. This year, not so much. So, I've decided to create the UTRS (Uncle Tim Ranking System), which, for those who care, is pronounced "uterus." Think of my ranking system as a surrogate until The All Around steps in and takes over.

As per usual, take these rankings with a grain of salt. (Pro Tip: Never bet your life savings based on my numbers–or my predictions for that matter.) Judging varies from meet to meet, and as you can see, I've culled these scores from several meets. I've included the competition names so that you can decide how much crack the judges smoked before handing out the scores.

More than anything, you should think of these tables like this: New quad, new Code of Points. What the H is a good score nowadays? Well, let me show you…

Key:

  • Bold Face: An update since the last iteration of the UTRS.
  • An asterisk (*): Usually denotes a routine for which I have a final score without a D score.
  • Parentheses ( ): Marks gymnasts who are not part of the U.S. National Team. Even though they cannot compete for the U.S. in international meets, I'd like to recognize that their scores are world class.
  • Links, when available, are provided for the top 5 routines.



Men's All-Around Rankings: Best Scores
NameCountryScoreMeet
1. Kohei Uchimura
(内村航平)
Japan91.850Japanese Nationals
2. Max WhitlockGreat Britain90.650British Championships
3. Oleg Verniaiev
(Олег Верняєв)
Ukraine90.500University Games
4. Ryohei Kato
(加藤凌平)
Japan90.250University Games
5. Oleg StepkoUkraine90.050University Games
6. Nikolai KuksenkovRussia89.950University Games
7. Fabian HambuechenGermany89.850University Games
8. David Belyavskiy
(Давид Белявский)
Russia89.799European Championships
9. Jake DaltonUSA89.398American Cup
10. Daniel PurvisGreat Britain89.250Tokyo World Cup
11. Liu RongbingChina89.134Chinese Nationals
12. Kazuhito TanakaJapan89.100NHK Cup
13.Yusuke TanakaJapan89.050Japanese Nationals
13. Shogo NonomuraJapan89.050NHK Cup
15. Fabian GonzálezSpain89.000Spanish Nationals


Men's Floor Rankings: Best D Scores


NameCountryD-ScoreMeet
1. Shirai Kenzo
(白井健三)
Japan7.3Japanese Nationals
2. Denis Ablyazin
(Аблязин Денис)
Russia7.1University Games
3. Flavius KocziRomania7.0European Championships
4. Ryohei Kato
(加藤凌平)
Japan6.8Tokyo World Cup
5. Oleg Verniaiev
(Олег Верняєв)
Ukraine6.7Tokyo World Cup
5. Sergio SasakiBrazil6.7Tokyo World Cup
5. Kohei Uchimura
(内村航平)
Japan6.7Japanese Nationals
8. Max WhitlockGreat Britain6.6European Championships
8. Matthias FahrigGermany6.6European Championships
8. Jeffrey WammesNetherlands6.6European Championships
8. Paul RuggeriUSA6.6Winter Cup
12. David Belyavskiy
(Давид Белявский)
Russia6.5European Championships
12. Alexander ShatilovIsrael6.5European Championships
12. Daniel PurvisGreat Britain6.5European Championships
12. Eleftherios Kosmidis
(Ελευθέριος Κοσμίδης)
Greece6.5European Championships
12. Vlad Bogdan CotunaRomania6.5European Championships
12. Jake DaltonUSA6.5Cottbus
12. Arthur OyakawaBrazil6.5Cottbus
12. Trevor Howard(USA)6.5Winter Cup
12. Stacey Ervin(USA)6.5Winter Cup
12. Eddie PenevUSA6.5Winter Cup
12. Deng ShudiChina6.5Chinese Nationals
12. Arthur OyakawaBrazil6.5Cottbus
12. Zhou Shixiong
(周施雄)
China6.5Chinese Nationals
12. Enrique Tomás GonzálezChile6.5Anadia
12. Thomas TaranuGermany6.5University Games
12. Christian BazanSpain6.5Spanish Nationals

Men's Floor Rankings: Best Scores


NameCountryFinal ScoreMeet
1. Shirai Kenzo
(白井健三)
Japan15.900All-Japan Championships
2. Kohei Uchimura
(内村航平)
Japan15.800NHK Cup
3. Jake DaltonUSA15.700American Cup
4. Adrian de los AngelesUSA15.650Winter Cup
4. Denis AblyazinRussia15.650University Games
6. Max WhitlockGreat Britain15.500European Championships
6. Ryohei Kato
(加藤凌平)
Japan15.500University Games
8. Stacey Ervin(USA)15.450Winter Cup
9. David Belyavskiy
(Давид Белявский)
Russia15.433European Championships
10. Kristian ThomasGreat Britain15.400American Cup
10. Matthias FahrigGermany15.400German Nationals
12. Diego HypólitoBrazil15.375Anadia
13. Flavius KocziRomania15.366French International
13. Sam OldhamGreat Britain15.366European Championships
13. Eleftherios Kosmidis
(Ελευθέριος Κοσμίδης)
Greece15.366Mediterranean Games

Women's UTRS: Best Scores of 2013 Updated July 28


Last year, The All Around created some handy dandy rankings, leading up to the Olympics. This year, not so much. So, I've decided to create the UTRS (Uncle Tim Ranking System), which, for those who care, is pronounced "uterus." Think of my ranking system as a surrogate until The All Around steps in and takes over.

As per usual, take these rankings with a grain of salt. (Pro Tip: Never bet your life savings based on my numbers–or my predictions for that matter.) Judging varies from meet to meet, and as you can see, I've culled these scores from several meets. I've included the competition names so that you can decide how much crack the judges smoked before handing out the scores.

More than anything, you should think of these tables like this: New quad, new Code of Points. What the H is a good score nowadays? Well, let me show you…

Key:

  • Bold Face: An update since the last iteration of the UTRS.
  • An asterisk (*): Usually denotes a routine for which I have a final score without a D score.
  • Links, when available, are provided for the top 5 routines.

Women's All-Around Rankings: Best Scores

NameCountryScoreMeet
1. Simone BilesUSA60.400Jesolo
2. Aliya MustafinaRussia59.850Russian Nationals
3. Kyla RossUSA59.300GER-ROU-USA Friendly Meet
4. Katelyn OhashiUSA59.199American Cup
5. Larisa IordacheRomania58.432European Championships
6. Peyton ErnstUSA58.250Secret Classic
7. Roxana PopaSpain58.083Spanish Nationals
8. Anastasia GrishinaRussia57.932European Championships
9. Yao JinnanChina57.468Chinese Nationals
10. Victoria MoorsCanada57.400Comaneci International
11. Yevgenia ShelgunovaRussia57.250Russian Nationals
12. Brenna DowellUSA57.200Secret Classic
13. Diana BulimarRomania57.065European Championships
13. Giulia SteingruberSwitzerland57.065European Championships
14. Ksenia AfanasyevaRussia56.850University Games
15. Asuka TeramotoJapan56.825Tokyo World Cup
16. Jessica LopezVenezuela56.800Comaneci International
16. Abigail MillietUSA56.800Secret Classic



Women's Vault Rankings: Best D Score Averages
In other words, who has the most scoring potential? 


NameCountryD 1D 2D Avg.Meet
1. Hong Un JongNorth Korea6.36.46.35Universiades
2. McKayla MaroneyUSA6.36.06.15Secret Classic
3. Mykayla SkinnerUSA6.45.86.1Secret Classic
3. Fadwa MahmoudEgypt7.05.26.1Mediterranean Games
3. Ri Un HaNorth Korea5.86.46.1Doha
3. Ellie BlackCanada6.26.06.1Universiades
3. Alexa Moreno MedinaMexico6.26.06.1Universiades
8. Phan Thi Ha ThanhVietnam5.86.26.0Doha
9. Simone BilesUSA6.35.65.95Jesolo
9. Maria PasekaRussia6.35.65.95Europeans
9. Ksenia AfanasyevaRussia6.35.65.95Universiades
12. Giulia SteingruberSwitzerland6.25.25.7Europeans
12. Jade BarbosaBrazil5.85.65.7Anadia
12. Alla SosnitskayaRussia5.85.65.7Anadia
15. Oksana ChusovitinaUzbekistan5.85.55.65Cottbus



Women's Vault Rankings: Best Avg. Scores


NameCountryFinal ScoreMeet
1. McKayla MaroneyUSA15.425Secret Classic
2. Simone BilesUSA15.350Jesolo
3. Hong Un JongNorth Korea15.125Universiades
3. Ksenia AfanasyevaRussia15.125Universiades
5. Maria PasekaRussia14.950Universiades
6. Oksana ChusovitinaUzbekistan14.887Cottbus
7. Mykayla SkinnerUSA14.875Secret Classic
8. Ellie BlackCanada14.862Universiades
9. Phan Thi Ha Thanh Vietnam14.825Doha
9. Jade BarbosaBrazil14.825Anadia
11. Giulia SteingruberSwitzerland14.783Europeans
12. Larisa IordacheRomania14.675Doha
13. Noel Van KlavarenNetherlands14.583Europeans

Tuesday, July 23, 2013

The Exclusive Triple-Twisting Yurchenko Club

As far as I know, only two male gymnasts have competed a recognizable triple-twisting Yurchenko. They are…

2007: Sasha Artemev



USAG, who chose this preview screen? Sasha's butt? Really?

Here's Sasha's attempt from day 1.

2010: Kohei Uchimura



Glad those knees stayed intact!

Kohei's chest was higher than Sasha's, but it looks like the former's Yurchenko headspring technique hinders him a bit, slowing his block down. As you'll see with Shirai Kenzo's vault (below), Kenzo comes on with straighter arms, which gives him a quicker block.

Friday, July 19, 2013

Book Review: Louis: My Story So Far



Every gymnastics book is incredibly formulaic. Overactive child worries family. Worried mother enrolls child in gymnastics. Coach sees talent. Family must cart child 20+ miles to the nearest gym because it is the best one around. Family must make sacrifices. But eventually, the talented child succeeds.


Let's face it; that's the narrative skeleton of every gymnast's biography or memoir. Which means that we, as readers, judge gymnastics books not so much on their barebones storylines, but on the flesh that the author (or ghostwriter) attaches to his narrative skeleton. And in the case of Louis: My Story So Far, there is a lot of flesh. (See photo to the left.)

That is to say that Louis's book is a far cry from the emaciated, vapid literary world of female gymnasts. Louis's book actually has something called personality, and unlike Gabrielle Douglas's Grace, Gold, and Glory, Louis's book doesn't need its own laugh track. (Nothing against her; I just can't believe Gabby's book used the acronym LOL…) Simply paging through the memoir will provide readers with laughs. I mean, just look at this photo…

And really, laughs are what this book is all about. Because, in case you haven't noticed, humor is Louis's defense mechanism.


Tuesday, July 16, 2013

Danell Leyva Status Update: Improving

Since London, Danell Leyva has had a rough go at things. No, there haven't been more scandalous photos floating around the interwebs. (Darn.) It's his gymnastics and health--not his judgment--that have been under scrutiny. In case you haven't been keeping track…

At the 2012 Stuttgart World Cup, Danny Boy, as his dad calls him, took 5th in the all-around. A week later, he took 4th in the all-around at the Glasgow World Cup. In February, under the new Code of Points, he finished 3rd behind London Olympian Jake Dalton and Michigan gymnast Adrian de los Angeles. At the time, he was sick with a cold. Weeks later, he came down with the flu, but still competed at the American Cup. He finished sixth. In May, he withdrew from the Tokyo World Cup with a shoulder injury.

Setting Tokyo aside, these aren't bad results. That said, quite frankly, gymnastics fans had higher expectations for Danell. It wasn't until this past weekend that Danell finally did what people expect him to do. He won. At the U.S. National Qualifier, he posted the highest all-around score of the competition and his personal best of the year: an 87.000.

If you've been looking at the UTRS, this is not one of the highest scores of the year, but for Danell, it is an improvement. And I'd like to highlight some of the areas that have improved.

1. Vault

Leading up to the Olympics, Danell struggled with his Kasamatsu 1.5 on vault, so he downgraded it to a Kasamatsu full at the Olympics. By the beginning of 2013, however, the harder vault was back in his repertoire.

This was worrisome at the American Cup. After watching Danell do a tumbling pass which consisted of skipping, we prayed that Danell would downgrade his vault. Which he didn't do. But praise the gym gods! he still landed it. Which prompted Yin Alvarez to compliment Danell on his "cojones" ("balls") on national TV. (NBC, how did that one get past you?)

Anyway, I digress. With Danell's Kasamatsu, as with most vaults, really, the difference between a good vault and a bad vault is a matter of heel drive. At the Olympic Trials, his heel drive was lacking. Almost a year later, at the National Qualifier, it was much better. As 2013 continues, keep an eye on Danell's feet.


Let's Play a Game! It's Called "Credit/No Credit"

Yeah, yeah, I know… I haven't finish my recap of the World University Games, but I have more important things to do. Like, grouse about the Code of Points.

As a 20-something who can't wait to turn 65, retire, sit on his porch, drink Old Fashions, yell at the neighborhood kids, and write scathing letters to the editor about the ugly paint job on his neighbor's house, I can safely say that complaining is what I do best. And I want to teach you how to do it too!

Here's how to play "Credit/No Credit."

Background Information: In the men's Code of Points, a straddled Tkatchev is a C. If you add a half twist, it becomes a D. Similarly, a stretched Tkatchev is a D, and if you add a half twist, it becomes an E. 
Easy peasy, right? But wait, there's a catch… (Get it? We're talking about releases, and I just said, "There's a catch." So punny, I know. Anyhoo…)
The catch: If the gymnast performs a straddled Tkatchev 1/2 "without sufficient turning," the gymnast does not receive credit for a D, but rather, for a C. Likewise, a stretched Tkatchev 1/2 can be downgraded one letter for insufficient turning.
Sneaky S.O.B.: Now, I want one thing to be clear: I didn't make up the inane phrase "without sufficient turning." It comes straight from the Code of Points. That's why it's in quotes. A certain member of the Men's Technical Committee carefully crafted the blissfully ambiguous wording of this section. I mean, what the heck does "without sufficient turning" mean anyway? 
On floor, insufficient twisting is anything 90º or greater from the final position. So, a full that only goes around 270º (360-90=270) would not be credited as a full. But as you'll see, things are extra confusing up there on that pipe. It's not exactly clear what part of the body needs to turn 90º on high bar in order for the gymnast to receive credit for a Tkatchev 1/2. Are we talking shoulders, hips, and feet?
As you'll see in a hot second, that's expecting a lot from these chaps.
Your mission, if you should choose to accept it, is to decide what "insufficient turning" means. Then, look at the screenshots and determine whether the gymnast should receive credit or no credit for their Tkatchev 1/2. Make sense?
Oh, and if you are feeling up for it, share your judgments in the comments section below. If they are misanthropic enough, I might collect the best responses and put them in a separate blog post.

1. Jair Lynch, USA, 1992 Olympic Trials
Back in the day, before John Orozco was even born, Jair Lynch sent us down this Tkatchev 1/2 path. As you can see in the still above, we did not have high-definition television at the time, but I'm pretty sure you can see things well enough. We have feet that haven't really turned, hips that have turned maybe 45º, and shoulders that have turned 90º if you're feeling generous. Using today's Code, credit or no credit?

Saturday, July 13, 2013

2013 Universiades Qualifications Recapped: Where Do We Send Our Hate Mail?

What's that? You didn't have time to watch over 10 hours of gymnastics last week? And you call yourself a gymnastics fan? Hmm…

Just kidding. Let's put a dent in our ignorance, shall we? Here's a quick recap of the Team Finals. Since they showed only the fifth subdivision, that's what we'll be discussing below. If you'd like to follow along, you can find a replay here.

Rotation 1

The broadcast of the University Games opens with some spiffy graphics that include the judges' names. NBC, take note. A normal viewer wouldn't give two Makuts about this, but we gym nerds love it because now we know where to direct our hate mail when we don't like a score. (By the way, I'm kidding.)


The first gymnast up is Nikita Ignatyev, and he does a meh routine. I believe the announcer called it "safe." The opening pass is the show piece: a back 1.5 to front double. But after that, it's kind of standard fare: front double full to front full, etc. 15.100



Well, hello there, Cristian Bataga! Now, THAT's a face you should remember.






Unfortunately, our memory of his routine might not be so favorable. He kind of has cray cray legs on his double-double dismount. 13.550





After Bataga's wacky dismount, they cut away to this portrait. Honestly, I was so distracted that I missed Nikita's score when it flashed across the screen.






Then, it's over to Zhang Leyang, whose parallel bars routine makes us question whether L-sits are appropriate in elite gymnastics. (That's a sincere question. Feel free to sound off in the comments section.) It's a nice routine; Zhang has lovely lines on the event. But I associate L-sits with beginning gymnasts. 14.300



Ryohei Kato of Japan does a lovely Kasamatsu 1.5, but by this point of the competition--a whopping 7 minutes in--this girl is just over it. 14.900





Denis Ablyazin is next up on floor, and he's up to his usual shenanigans: doing 7 tumbling passes. He has bumped up his D score from a 7.0 to a 7.1, which gave him a 15.650.

This routine makes us thank the gym gods that the corner rule does not apply to the men, because Denis would look silly standing on one foot so many times.


Standings:
1. Russia, 46.050; 2. Ukraine, 45.150; 3. China, 45.000; 4. Japan, 44.150; 5. Brazil, 43.950


Rotation 2

We're back to Zhang Leyang. Execution snobs are still scarred from Zou Kai's "toe point," so comparatively speaking, everything Zhang does on the high bar looks stunning. Except for his "Tkatchev 1/2." This skill is just plain dumb. Most gymnasts, Zhang included, do a Tkatchev 1/4 and then finish the twist with both hands on the bar. Whenever I see that skill, I'm tempted to fast forward. But I didn't this time. Because TOE POINT!


It's back to Cristian Bataga. Woof. His passes are standard for a routine from the late 90s--back 2.5 to Rudi, Back 1.5 to front full, Double full, Thomas, full-in. Where he really makes an impression is on his corner jumps. (Look left.) What are these? They're like a sideways sissone starfish. 14.250




On the sidelines, we are treated to a shot of a gymnast's worst nightmare: farmer's tan. That's at least a 0.025 deduction if you have a gay judge.




Shogo Nonomura is up on parallel bars for Japan. His routine is elegant, but it's bordering on compulsory. It has a lot of the standard skills: a Tippelt, a Belle, a giant, a healy, a stutz, double pike, etc. 14.550






Pommel horse. Roughly 92% of the world hates this event, and David Belyavskiy is one of them. The entire week, he struggled on his scissors to handstand, walking down off the pommel. On top of that, he botched his dismount during qualifications. It wasn't of Uchimura proportions, but it was evident that he wanted to do more pirouetting. Oops. 14.900




Then, it's over to Shogo Nonomura, who is blowing his bangs in the air. If my memory serves me correctly, I haven't seen someone do that since Kim Zmeskal did it in '92 in Barcelona.







<3 A diehard fan. <3





Igor Radivilov has a small hop on his Tsuk double pike, and he immediately goes into a victory dance, which ends with him picking a wedgie right in front of the judges. No joke.

NFL players, take note. This is how a victory dance should end.




Chen Xuezhang's high bar routine is noteworthy because he does something very rare for a Chinese gymnast. A Kovacs! and not just a Kovacs, but one in combination (out of a Adler 1/2).

Seriously, off the top of your head, how many Kovacs-throwing Chinese gymnasts can you think of?

A gym nerd item of note: The Chinese gymnasts seem to favor a Stalder full pirouette, but instead of going over in their handstands, they do a front giant out of it in L-grip. (We need a name for this, so I'm going to call it the "Chinese Twirly" for now.) The skill's got a vintage vibe to it, which I dig, but the Chinese are struggling to get their stalders to handstand before reversing their direction, which I don't dig. 14.600

Standings:
1. Russia, 91.400; 2. Japan, 90.350; 3. Ukraine, 89.850; 4. Brazil, 88.050; 5. China, 88.000


Thursday, July 11, 2013

Women's UTRS: Best Scores of 2013 Updated July 11


Last year, The All Around created some handy dandy rankings, leading up to the Olympics. This year, not so much. So, I've decided to create the UTRS (Uncle Tim Ranking System), which, for those who care, is pronounced "uterus." Think of my ranking system as a surrogate until The All Around steps in and takes over.

As per usual, take these rankings with a grain of salt. (Pro Tip: Never bet your life savings based on my numbers–or my predictions for that matter.) Judging varies from meet to meet, and as you can see, I've culled these scores from several meets. I've included the competition names so that you can decide how much crack the judges smoked before handing out the scores.

More than anything, you should think of these tables like this: New quad, new Code of Points. What the H is a good score nowadays? Well, let me show you…

Key:

  • Bold Face: An update since the last iteration of the UTRS.
  • An asterisk (*): Usually denotes a routine for which I have a final score without a D score.
  • Links, when available, are provided for the top 5 routines.

Women's All-Around Rankings: Best Scores

NameCountryScoreMeet
1. Simone BilesUSA60.400Jesolo
2. Aliya MustafinaRussia59.850Russian Nationals
3. Kyla RossUSA59.300GER-ROU-USA Friendly Meet
4. Katelyn OhashiUSA59.199American Cup
5. Larisa IordacheRomania58.432European Championships
6. Peyton ErnstUSA58.000GER-ROU-USA Friendly Meet
7. Anastasia GrishinaRussia57.932European Championships
8. Yao JinnanChina57.468Chinese Nationals
9. Victoria MoorsCanada57.400Comaneci International
10. Yevgenia ShelgunovaRussia57.250Russian Nationals
11. Diana BulimarRomania57.065European Championships
11. Giulia SteingruberSwitzerland57.065European Championships
13. Ksenia AfanasyevaRussia56.850University Games
14. Asuka TeramotoJapan56.825Tokyo World Cup
15. Jessica LopezVenezuela56.800Comaneci International



Women's Vault Rankings: Best D Score Averages
In other words, who has the most scoring potential? 


NameCountryD 1D 2D Avg.Meet
1. Hong Un JongNorth Korea6.36.46.35Universiades
2. Fadwa MahmoudEgypt7.05.26.1Mediterranean Games
2. Ri Un HaNorth Korea5.86.46.1Doha
2. Ellie BlackCanada6.26.06.1Universiades
2. Alexa Moreno MedinaMexico6.26.06.1Universiades
6. Phan Thi Ha ThanhVietnam5.86.26.0Doha
7. Simone BilesUSA6.35.65.95Jesolo
7. Maria PasekaRussia6.35.65.95Europeans
7. Ksenia AfanasyevaRussia6.35.65.95Universiades
8. Giulia SteingruberSwitzerland6.25.25.7Europeans
9. Jade BarbosaBrazil5.85.65.7Anadia
9. Alla SosnitskayaRussia5.85.65.7Anadia
11. Oksana ChusovitinaUzbekistan5.85.55.65Cottbus



Women's Vault Rankings: Best Avg. Scores


NameCountryFinal ScoreMeet
1. Simone BilesUSA15.350Jesolo
2. Hong Un JongNorth Korea15.125Universiades
2. Ksenia AfanasyevaRussia15.125Universiades
4. Maria PasekaRussia14.950Universiades
5. Oksana ChusovitinaUzbekistan14.887Cottbus
6. Ellie BlackCanada14.862Universiades
7. Phan Thi Ha Thanh Vietnam14.825Doha
7. Jade BarbosaBrazil14.825Anadia
9. Giulia SteingruberSwitzerland14.783Europeans
10. Larisa IordacheRomania14.675Doha
11. Noel Van KlavarenNetherlands14.583Europeans

Men's UTRS: Best Scores of 2013 Updated July 11


Last year, The All Around created some handy dandy rankings, leading up to the Olympics. This year, not so much. So, I've decided to create the UTRS (Uncle Tim Ranking System), which, for those who care, is pronounced "uterus." Think of my ranking system as a surrogate until The All Around steps in and takes over.

As per usual, take these rankings with a grain of salt. (Pro Tip: Never bet your life savings based on my numbers–or my predictions for that matter.) Judging varies from meet to meet, and as you can see, I've culled these scores from several meets. I've included the competition names so that you can decide how much crack the judges smoked before handing out the scores.

More than anything, you should think of these tables like this: New quad, new Code of Points. What the H is a good score nowadays? Well, let me show you…

Key:

  • Bold Face: An update since the last iteration of the UTRS.
  • An asterisk (*): Usually denotes a routine for which I have a final score without a D score.
  • Parentheses ( ): Marks gymnasts who are not part of the U.S. National Team. Even though they cannot compete for the U.S. in international meets, I'd like to recognize that their scores are world class.
  • Links, when available, are provided for the top 5 routines.



Men's All-Around Rankings: Best Scores
NameCountryScoreMeet
1. Kohei Uchimura
(内村航平)
Japan91.850Japanese Nationals
2. Max WhitlockGreat Britain90.650British Championships
3. Oleg Verniaiev
(Олег Верняєв)
Ukraine90.500University Games
4. Ryohei Kato
(加藤凌平)
Japan90.250University Games
5. Oleg StepkoUkraine90.050University Games
6. Nikolai KuksenkovRussia89.950University Games
7. Fabian HambuechenGermany89.850University Games
8. David Belyavskiy
(Давид Белявский)
Russia89.799European Championships
9. Jake DaltonUSA89.398American Cup
10. Daniel PurvisGreat Britain89.250Tokyo World Cup
11. Liu RongbingChina89.134Chinese Nationals
12. Kazuhito TanakaJapan89.100NHK Cup
13.Yusuke TanakaJapan89.050Japanese Nationals
13. Shogo NonomuraJapan89.050NHK Cup
15. Nikita IgnatyevRussia88.850University Games


Men's Floor Rankings: Best D Scores


NameCountryD-ScoreMeet
1. Shirai Kenzo
(白井健三)
Japan7.3Japanese Nationals
2. Denis Ablyazin
(Аблязин Денис)
Russia7.1University Games
3. Flavius KocziRomania7.0European Championships
4. Ryohei Kato
(加藤凌平)
Japan6.8Tokyo World Cup
5. Oleg Verniaiev
(Олег Верняєв)
Ukraine6.7Tokyo World Cup
5. Sergio SasakiBrazil6.7Tokyo World Cup
5. Kohei Uchimura
(内村航平)
Japan6.7Japanese Nationals
8. Max WhitlockGreat Britain6.6European Championships
8. Matthias FahrigGermany6.6European Championships
8. Jeffrey WammesNetherlands6.6European Championships
8. Paul RuggeriUSA6.6Winter Cup
12. David Belyavskiy
(Давид Белявский)
Russia6.5European Championships
12. Alexander ShatilovIsrael6.5European Championships
12. Daniel PurvisGreat Britain6.5European Championships
12. Eleftherios Kosmidis
(Ελευθέριος Κοσμίδης)
Greece6.5European Championships
12. Vlad Bogdan CotunaRomania6.5European Championships
12. Jake DaltonUSA6.5Cottbus
12. Arthur OyakawaBrazil6.5Cottbus
12. Trevor Howard(USA)6.5Winter Cup
12. Stacey Ervin(USA)6.5Winter Cup
12. Eddie PenevUSA6.5Winter Cup
12. Deng ShudiChina6.5Chinese Nationals
12. Arthur OyakawaBrazil6.5Cottbus
12. Zhou Shixiong
(周施雄)
China6.5Chinese Nationals
12. Enrique Tomás GonzálezChile6.5Anadia
12. Thomas TaranuGermany6.5University Games

Men's Floor Rankings: Best Scores


NameCountryFinal ScoreMeet
1. Shirai Kenzo
(白井健三)
Japan15.900All-Japan Championships
2. Kohei Uchimura
(内村航平)
Japan15.800NHK Cup
3. Jake DaltonUSA15.700American Cup
4. Adrian de los AngelesUSA15.650Winter Cup
4. Denis AblyazinRussia15.650University Games
6. Max WhitlockGreat Britain15.500European Championships
6. Ryohei Kato
(加藤凌平)
Japan15.500University Games
8. Stacey Ervin(USA)15.450Winter Cup
9. David Belyavskiy
(Давид Белявский)
Russia15.433European Championships
10. Kristian ThomasGreat Britain15.400American Cup
10. Matthias FahrigGermany15.400German Nationals
12. Diego HypólitoBrazil15.375Anadia
13. Flavius KocziRomania15.366French International
14. Sam OldhamGreat Britain15.366European Championships
14. Eleftherios Kosmidis
(Ελευθέριος Κοσμίδης)
Greece15.366Mediterranean Games

Monday, July 8, 2013

The Apogee of Gym Nerdery

A certain faction of the gymnastics world longs for the days of compulsories. The line of thinking seems to be, If only had compulsories again, everything would be better. If only…

Well, I have good news: compulsories are making a comeback--but only in a small bubble of the gymnastics world (read: my personal bubble). This week, I will be teaching myself the compulsories from the 1960 Olympics. In case you've never seen them, here's the high bar routine:
I love the plié on the landing.

And the routine on parallel bars:

I'm going to face plant so hard on that dismount.

And just to make sure that I'm the biggest gym nerd on the face of the planet, I'm not only going to learn the men's routines, but I'm going to learn the women's routines, as well. There's one problem, though: I'm going to need a pianist…

Any volunteers?

Tuesday, July 2, 2013

Introducing Japan's World Championships Representatives



The World Championships are roughly 90 days away, and the gymternet is already shrieking with glee! Why? you ask.

Countries have begun to name their representatives for the 2013 World Championships!

Strike that.

1 country has named its representatives for the 2013 World Championships!

If that news doesn't make you want to run and do a double heel click, you should question your dedication to the sport of gymnastics.

Anyway, in case you haven't heard, the Japanese Gymnastics Federation has named its representatives for the 2013 World Championships. Let's get to know them, shall we? 


1. Kohei Uchimura: If you don't know who he is, you deserve to teach cheerleaders and strippers back handsprings every hour of every day for the rest of your life. (#BadGymCurses And yes, I know many coaches who have given private lessons to pole dancers. Call it an occupational hazard.) Even though it's a cliché to say this, Kohei is the king of gymnastics right now. This year, he has routinely scored in the 90-91-range in the all-around, while many of his opponents struggle to break 90 mark. Undoubtedly, the 2009 all-around champion, the 2010 all-around champion, the 2011 all-around champion, and the 2012 Olympic all-around champion will be everyone's pick to win the 2013 title. (You know that I'll pick someone else just to be a contrarian.)

Unlike someone like Max Whitlock, we haven't seen all that much of Kohei Uchimura in 2013. But I suppose when you're a legend like Kohei, you don't need to make many public appearances in order to maintain your image as the Superman of Men's Gymnastics. The gymternet is enough to preserve your reputation. In case you haven't noticed, every other month, a video surfaces of Kohei-the-Kovacs-Tease throwing release after release, and the internet explodes. Yet somehow, the combinations never seem to find their way into his routine, disappointing crazy gymnastics fans around the globe.

Really, we shouldn't be surprised, though. With execution like his, Kohei doesn't need an Epke-style routine. This year, he has posted one of the highest high bar scores without doing 4 releases in a row, and I'm sure that many will favor Kohei to win a high bar medal in Antwerp.

Okay, okay, okay, I think I've subjected you to enough Kohei Uchimura plaudits. But, please, let me mention one more thing: Kohei is also a floor champ (2011), and he could very well win a medal on floor, too! Weee!

Now that we're drunk on the Uchimura Juice, let's move on…


2. Ryohei Kato: Two Japanese gymnasts were on the all-around podium in 2011 in Tokyo. In case you ever need to know this factoid for Uncle Tim's Gymnastics Trivia (coming to a happy hour at a sports bar near you), those 2 gymnasts were Kohei Uchimura and Koji Yamamuro. Call me crazy, but I'm guessing that Japan would love to repeat that performance--if not better it. And with Ryohei Kato, the Japanese could very well do that.

So what do we know about Ryohei Kato? He's a sneaky one. Seriously, he kind of snuck up on gymnastics fans like your significant other's birthday sneaks up on you or like the first "r" in February sneaks up on you. I mean, sure, Ryohei Kato was part of the 2012 Olympic team, but he lived in the shadows of the team's headliners like Kohei Uchimura, Kazuhito Tanaka, and Koji Yamamuro.

2013, though, has been all about Ryohei Kato. He began the FIG circuit this year by placing first on parallel bars at the French International. (It was much to my dismay, as he defeated Oleg Verniaiev.) Then, at the Tokyo World Cup, he proved that he was a force to be reckoned with in the all-around. He finished second behind my man Oleg Verniaiev, and a few weeks later, he finished second at the Japanese Nationals, defeating exceptional gymnasts like Yusuke Tanaka, Shogo Nonomura, Koji Yamamuro, and Kazuhito Tanaka in the all-around.

It's unlikely that Ryohei Kato will be able to catch Kohei Uchimura in 2013, but it'll be fun to see if Kato can keep the momentum going in Antwerp.


Monday, July 1, 2013

2013 Women's UTRS: Best Scores Updated July 1


Last year, The All Around created some handy dandy rankings, leading up to the Olympics. This year, not so much. So, I've decided to create the UTRS (Uncle Tim Ranking System), which, for those who care, is pronounced "uterus." Think of my ranking system as a surrogate until The All Around steps in and takes over.

As per usual, take these rankings with a grain of salt. (Pro Tip: Never bet your life savings based on my numbers–or my predictions for that matter.) Judging varies from meet to meet, and as you can see, I've culled these scores from several meets. I've included the competition names so that you can decide how much crack the judges smoked before handing out the scores.

More than anything, you should think of these tables like this: New quad, new Code of Points. What the H is a good score nowadays? Well, let me show you…

Key:

  • Bold Face: An update since the last iteration of the UTRS.
  • An asterisk (*): Usually denotes a routine for which I have a final score without a D score.
  • Links, when available, are provided for the top 5 routines.

Women's All-Around Rankings: Best Scores

NameCountryScoreMeet
1. Simone BilesUSA60.400Jesolo
2. Aliya MustafinaRussia59.850Russian Nationals
3. Kyla RossUSA59.300GER-ROU-USA Friendly Meet
4. Katelyn OhashiUSA59.199American Cup
5. Larisa IordacheRomania58.432European Championships
6. Peyton ErnstUSA58.000GER-ROU-USA Friendly Meet
7. Anastasia GrishinaRussia57.932European Championships
8. Yao JinnanChina57.468Chinese Nationals
9. Victoria MoorsCanada57.400Comaneci International
10. Yevgenia ShelgunovaRussia57.250Russian Nationals
11. Diana BulimarRomania57.065European Championships
11. Giulia SteingruberSwitzerland57.065European Championships
13. Ksenia AfanasyevaRussia56.850Russian Nationals
14. Asuka TeramotoJapan56.825Tokyo World Cup
15. Jessica LopezVenezuela56.800Comaneci International




Women's Vault Rankings: Best D Score Averages
In other words, who has the most scoring potential? 


NameCountryD 1D 2D Avg.Meet
1. Fadwa MahmoudEgypt7.05.26.1Mediterranean Games
1. Ri Un HaNorth Korea5.86.46.1Doha
3. Phan Thi Ha ThanhVietnam5.86.26.0Doha
4. Simone BilesUSA6.35.65.95Jesolo
4. Maria PasekaRussia6.35.65.95Europeans
6. Alexa Moreno Medina*Mexico6.25.55.85French International
7. Giulia SteingruberSwitzerland6.25.25.7Europeans
7. Jade BarbosaBrazil5.85.65.7Anadia
7. Alla SosnitskayaRussia5.85.65.7Anadia
10. Oksana ChusovitinaUzbekistan5.85.55.65Cottbus

*Interpretation of the French International Qualifications score sheet? Anyone?


Women's Vault Rankings: Best Scores


NameCountryFinal ScoreMeet
1. Simone BilesUSA15.350Jesolo
2. Oksana ChusovitinaUzbekistan14.887Cottbus
3. Phan Thi Ha Thanh Vietnam14.825Doha
3. Jade BarbosaBrazil14.825Anadia
5. Giulia SteingruberSwitzerland14.783Europeans
6. Maria PasekaRussia14.733Europeans
7. Larisa IordacheRomania14.675Doha
8. Noel Van KlavarenNetherlands14.583Europeans
9. Ri Un HaNorth Korea14.437Doha
10. Maegan ChantCanada14.375Cottbus
10. Ellie BlackCanada14.375Ljubljana

2013 Men's UTRS: Best Scores Updated July 1


I'm kind of obsessed with this routine. The 2008 bronze medalist's swing is smooth like butter. Yum.

Last year, The All Around created some handy dandy rankings, leading up to the Olympics. This year, not so much. So, I've decided to create the UTRS (Uncle Tim Ranking System), which, for those who care, is pronounced "uterus." Think of my ranking system as a surrogate until The All Around steps in and takes over.

As per usual, take these rankings with a grain of salt. (Pro Tip: Never bet your life savings based on my numbers–or my predictions for that matter.) Judging varies from meet to meet, and as you can see, I've culled these scores from several meets. I've included the competition names so that you can decide how much crack the judges smoked before handing out the scores.

More than anything, you should think of these tables like this: New quad, new Code of Points. What the H is a good score nowadays? Well, let me show you…

Key:

  • Bold Face: An update since the last iteration of the UTRS.
  • An asterisk (*): Usually denotes a routine for which I have a final score without a D score.
  • Parentheses ( ): Marks gymnasts who are not part of the U.S. National Team. Even though they cannot compete for the U.S. in international meets, I'd like to recognize that their scores are world class.
  • Links, when available, are provided for the top 5 routines.



Men's All-Around Rankings: Best Scores
NameCountryScoreMeet
1. Kohei Uchimura
(内村航平)
Japan91.850Japanese Nationals
2. Max WhitlockGreat Britain90.650British Championships
3. Oleg Verniaiev
(Олег Верняєв)
Ukraine90.375Tokyo World Cup
4. Ryohei Kato
(加藤凌平)
Japan90.175Tokyo World Cup
5. David Belyavskiy
(Давид Белявский)
Russia89.799European Championships
6. Jake DaltonUSA89.398American Cup
7. Daniel PurvisGreat Britain89.250Tokyo World Cup
8. Liu RongbingChina89.134Chinese Nationals
9. Kazuhito TanakaJapan89.100NHK Cup
10. Yusuke TanakaJapan89.050NHK Cup
10. Shogo NonomuraJapan89.050NHK Cup
12. Fabian GonzalezSpain88.700Tokyo World Cup
13. Fabian HambuechenGermany88.650German Nationals
14. Lin ChaopanChina88.568Chinese Nationals
15. Kenya KobayashiJapan88.300Japanese Nationals


Men's Floor Rankings: Best D Scores


NameCountryD-ScoreMeet
1. Shirai Kenzo
(白井健三)
Japan7.3Japanese Nationals
2. Denis Ablyazin
(Аблязин Денис)
Russia7.0European Championships
2. Flavius KocziRomania7.0European Championships
4. Ryohei Kato
(加藤凌平)
Japan6.8Tokyo World Cup
5. Oleg Verniaiev
(Олег Верняєв)
Ukraine6.7Tokyo World Cup
5. Sergio SasakiBrazil6.7Tokyo World Cup
5. Kohei Uchimura
(内村航平)
Japan6.7Japanese Nationals
8. Max WhitlockGreat Britain6.6European Championships
8. Matthias FahrigGermany6.6European Championships
8. Jeffrey WammesNetherlands6.6European Championships
8. Paul RuggeriUSA6.6Winter Cup
12. David Belyavskiy
(Давид Белявский)
Russia6.5European Championships
12. Alexander ShatilovIsrael6.5European Championships
12. Daniel PurvisGreat Britain6.5European Championships
12. Eleftherios Kosmidis
(Ελευθέριος Κοσμίδης)
Greece6.5European Championships
12. Vlad Bogdan CotunaRomania6.5European Championships
12. Jake DaltonUSA6.5Cottbus
12. Arthur OyakawaBrazil6.5Cottbus
12. Trevor Howard(USA)6.5Winter Cup
12. Stacey Ervin(USA)6.5Winter Cup
12. Eddie PenevUSA6.5Winter Cup
12. Deng ShudiChina6.5Chinese Nationals
12. Arthur OyakawaBrazil6.5Cottbus
12. Zhou Shixiong
(周施雄)
China6.5Chinese Nationals
12. Enrique Tomás GonzálezChile6.5Anadia

Men's Floor Rankings: Best Scores


NameCountryFinal ScoreMeet
1. Shirai Kenzo
(白井健三)
Japan15.900All-Japan Championships
2. Kohei Uchimura
(内村航平)
Japan15.800NHK Cup
3. Jake DaltonUSA15.700American Cup
4. Adrian de los AngelesUSA15.650Winter Cup
5. Max WhitlockGreat Britain15.500European Championships
6. Stacey Ervin(USA)15.450Winter Cup
7. David Belyavskiy
(Давид Белявский)
Russia15.433European Championships
8. Kristian ThomasGreat Britain15.400American Cup
8. Matthias FahrigGermany15.400German Nationals
10. Diego HypólitoBrazil15.375Anadia
11. Flavius KocziRomania15.366French International
11. Sam OldhamGreat Britain15.366European Championships
11. Eleftherios Kosmidis
(Ελευθέριος Κοσμίδης)
Greece15.366Mediterranean Games
14. Denis Ablyazin
(Аблязин Денис)
Russia15.350Russian Nationals
15. Alexander ShatilovIsrael15.333European Championships