Friday, May 31, 2013

UTRS: 2013 High Bar Scores

 The hot pink trend has spilled over into U.S. men's gymnastics. Check out Danell's socks!
FOL.

Last year, The All Around created some handy dandy rankings, leading up to the Olympics. This year, not so much. So, I've decided to create the UTRS (Uncle Tim Ranking System), which, for those who care, is pronounced "uterus." Think of my ranking system as a surrogate until The All Around steps in and takes over. (Yup, I'm still waiting!)

As per usual, take these rankings with a grain of salt. (Pro Tip: Never bet your life savings based on my numbers–or my predictions for that matter.) Judging varies from meet to meet, and as you can see, I've culled these scores from several meets. I've included the competition names so that you can decide how much crack the judges smoked before handing out the scores.

More than anything, you should think of these tables like this: New quad, new Code of Points. What the H is a good score nowadays? Well, let me show you…

(Updated: June 4, 2013–Videos from Chinese Nationals are slowly popping up…)


Men's High Bar Rankings: Best D Scores


Name Country D-Score Meet
1. Danell Leyva USA 7.2 Winter Cup
2. Koji Uematsu Japan 7.1 Cottbus
2. Emin Garibov Russia 7.1 French International
4. Kohei Uchimura Japan 7.0 Japanese Nationals
4. Umit Samiloglu Turkey 7.0 Doha
6. Liu Rongbing China 6.9 Chinese Nationals
6. Lin Chaopan China 6.9 Chinese Nationals
8. Christopher Jursch Germany 6.8 German Nationals
8. Yusuke Tanaka Japan 6.8 Japanese Nationals
8. Jossimar Calvo Moreno Colombia 6.8 Ljubljana
8. Andreas Bretschneider Germany 6.8 Cottbus
12. Fabian Hambuechen Germany 6.7 German Nationals
12. Marijo Moznik Croatia 6.7 Ljubljana
12. Fabian Gonzalez Spain 6.7 Tokyo
12. Paul Ruggeri USA 6.7 Winter Cup

There very well could be more Japanese gymnasts in this list. It's just a pain in the keaster to find their D scores.

Thursday, May 30, 2013

UTRS: 2013 WAG Floor Scores



Last year, The All Around created some handy dandy rankings, leading up to the Olympics. This year, not so much. So, I've decided to create the UTRS (Uncle Tim Ranking System), which, for those who care, is pronounced "uterus." Think of my ranking system as a surrogate until The All Around steps in and takes over. (Still waiting for that to happen… Any day now!)

As per usual, take these rankings with a grain of salt. (Pro Tip: Never bet your life savings based on my numbers–or my predictions for that matter.) Judging varies from meet to meet, and as you can see, I've culled these scores from several meets. I've included the competition names so that you can decide how much crack the judges smoked before handing out the scores.

More than anything, you should think of these tables like this: New quad, new Code of Points. What the H is a good score nowadays? Well, let me show you…



Women's Floor Rankings: Best D Scores


Name Country D-Score Meet
1. Ksenia Afanasyeva Russia 6.4 European Championships
2. Simone Biles USA 6.2 Jesolo
2. Mai Murakami Japan 6.2 Japanese Nationals
4. Larisa Iordache Romania 6.1 European Championships
4. Vanessa Ferrari Italy 6.1 American Cup
6. Gabriella Douglas Canada 6.0 Canadian Nationals
6. Shang Chungsong China 6.0 Chinese Nationals
6. Giulia Steingruber Switzerland 6.0 European Championships
9. Diana Bulimar Romania 5.9 European Championships
9. Victoria Moors Canada 5.9 Canadian Nationals
9. Aliya Mustafina Russia 5.9 European Championships
9. Lexie Priessman USA 5.9 GER-ROU-USA Friendly
9. Brenna Dowell USA 5.9 Jesolo
14. Anna Dementyeva Russia 5.8 Zakharova
14. Katelyn Ohashi USA 5.8 American Cup
14. Anastasia Grishina Russia 5.8 European Championships
14. Krystyna Sankova Ukraine 5.8 European Championships




Wednesday, May 29, 2013

UTRS: 2013 P-Bar Scores

A different look at Lucas Fischer, the bronze medalist at the 2013 European Championships

Last year, The All Around created some handy dandy rankings, leading up to the Olympics. This year, not so much. So, I've decided to create the UTRS (Uncle Tim Ranking System), which, for those who care, is pronounced "uterus." Think of my ranking system as a surrogate until The All Around steps in and takes over. (Yup, I'm still waiting!)

As per usual, take these rankings with a grain of salt. (Pro Tip: Never bet your life savings based on my numbers–or my predictions for that matter.) Judging varies from meet to meet, and as you can see, I've culled these scores from several meets. I've included the competition names so that you can decide how much crack the judges smoked before handing out the scores.

More than anything, you should think of these tables like this: New quad, new Code of Points. What the H is a good score nowadays? Well, let me show you…

(Updated: June 4, 2013–Videos from Chinese Nationals are slowly popping up…)


Men's P-Bar Rankings: Best D Scores


Name Country D-Score Meet
1. Zhou Shixiong China 7.0 Chinese Nationals
2. Jossimar Calvo Moreno Colombia 6.9 Ljubljana
2. You Hao China 6.9 Chinese Nationals
4. Phuoc Hung Pham Vietnam 6.8 Ljubljana
4. Marcel Nguyen Germany 6.8 European Championships
4. Oleg Verniaiev Ukraine 6.8 Zakharova
4. Kim Jin Hyok North Korea 6.8 Doha
4. Deng Shudi China 6.8 Chinese Nationals
9. Ryohei Kato Japan 6.7 Tokyo
9. Koji Uematsu Japan 6.7 Cottbus
9. Danell Leyva USA 6.7 French International
9. Daniel Keatings Great Britain 6.7 British Championships
14. Brandon Wynn USA 6.6 Cottbus
14. Aliaksandr Tsarevich Belarus 6.6 Cottbus
14. Oleg Stepko Ukraine 6.6 European Championships
14. Andrei Vasile Muntean Romania 6.6 European Championships
14. Emin Garibov Russia 6.6 European Championships


Tuesday, May 28, 2013

UTRS: 2013 Beam Scores

How's the 2012 Olympic beam champion doing this year?


Spoiler alert: Deng Linlin's not first in the rankings right now.

Last year, The All Around created some handy dandy rankings, leading up to the Olympics. This year, not so much. So, I've decided to create the UTRS (Uncle Tim Ranking System), which, for those who care, is pronounced "uterus." Think of my ranking system as a surrogate until The All Around steps in and takes over.

As per usual, take these rankings with a grain of salt. (Pro Tip: Never bet your life savings based on my numbers–or my predictions for that matter.) Judging varies from meet to meet, and as you can see, I've culled these scores from several meets. I've included the competition names so that you can decide how much crack the judges smoked before handing out the scores.

More than anything, you should think of these tables like this: New quad, new Code of Points. What the H is a good score nowadays? Well, let me show you…



Women's Beam Rankings: Best D Scores


Name Country D-Score Meet
1. Katelyn Ohashi USA 6.8 American Cup
2. Larisa Iordache Romania 6.7 Doha
3. Zeng Siqi China 6.6 Doha
4. Aliya Mustafina Russia 6.5 Zakharova
4. Wang Yan China 6.5 Chinese Nationals
6. Tan Sixin China 6.4 Chinese Nationals
6. Fan Yilin China 6.4 Chinese Nationals
8. Yao Jinnan China 6.3 Chinese Nationals
8. Zhang Yelinzi China 6.3 Chinese Nationals
8. Shang Chungsong China 6.3 Chinese Nationals
8. Sui Lu China 6.3 Chinese Nationals
8. Huang Qiushuang China 6.3 Chinese Nationals
8. Sophie Scheder Germany 6.3 GER-ROU-USA Friendly
8. Simone Biles USA 6.3 GER-ROU-USA Friendly
8. Gabby Jupp Great Britain 6.3 American Cup
8. Anna Dementyeva Russia 6.3 Zakharova




"It was a Deltchev! NOT a Gienger! IT'S A DELTCHEV!"

This was the best moment of the Pro Gymnastics Challenge. Hands down.

*Nastia Hair Flip*

Everyone learn how to do it!

It's the new "Bend and Snap"!


Note to self: Never piss off Nastia Liukin

Monday, May 27, 2013

UTRS: 2013 Men's Vault Scores


Last year, The All Around created some handy dandy rankings, leading up to the Olympics. This year, not so much. So, I've decided to create the UTRS (Uncle Tim Ranking System), which, for those who care, is pronounced "uterus." Think of my ranking system as a surrogate until The All Around steps in and takes over. (Seriously, whenever you want to take over… Any day now!)

As per usual, take these rankings with a grain of salt. (Pro Tip: Never bet your life savings based on my numbers–or my predictions for that matter.) Judging varies from meet to meet, and as you can see, I've culled these scores from several meets. I've included the competition names so that you can decide how much crack the judges smoked before handing out the scores.

More than anything, you should think of these tables like this: New quad, new Code of Points. What the H is a good score nowadays? Well, let me show you…



Men's Vault Rankings: Best D Score Averages
In other words, who has the most scoring potential? 


Name Country D 1 D 2 D Avg. Meet
1. Ri Se Gwang North Korea 6.4 6.4 6.4 Doha
2. Denis Ablyazin Russia 6.0 6.2 6.1 Europeans
3. Liao Quiuhua China 6.0 6.0 6.0 Doha
3. Theo Seager Great Britain 6.0 6.0 6.0 Europeans
3. Yang Hak Seon* South Korea 6.0 6.0 6.0 French International
3. Igor Radivilov Ukraine 6.0 6.0 6.0 Europeans
3. Oleg Verniaiev Ukraine 6.0 6.0 6.0 Europeans
8. Stanislav Valiyev Kazakhstan 6.0 5.6 5.8 Ljubljana
8. Yusuke Saito Japan 6.0 5.6 5.8 Doha
8. Shek Wai Hung Hong Kong 6.0 5.6 5.8 Doha
8. Ali Saadi Al-Tameemi Iraq 6.0 5.6 5.8 Doha
8. Jake Dalton USA 6.0 5.6 5.8 Cottbus
8. Pavel Bulauski Belarus 5.6 6.0 5.8 Cottbus
8. Nguyen Ha Thanh Vietnam 6.0 5.6 5.8 French International
8. Kristian Thomas Great Britain 6.0 5.6 5.8 French International
8. Enrique Tomas Gonzalez Chile 6.0 5.6 5.8 French International
8. Oleg Stepko Ukraine 5.6 6.0 5.8 Europeans
8. Matthias Fahrig Germany 6.0 5.6 5.8 Europeans
8. Flavius Koczi Romania 6.0 5.6 5.8 Europeans
8. Andrey Medvedev Israel 5.6 6.0 5.8 Europeans

*At the South Korean Nationals, Yang performed his namesake, which is a 6.4 vault. He also performed a Kasamatsu 2.5. The FIG has not given an official value to the second vault, but I'd assume that the Yang II will be valued as a 6.4 vault. So, Yang Hak Seon could be joining Ri Se Gwang with a 6.4 D average. Vault finals in Antwerp, come quickly.



Friday, May 24, 2013

UTRS: 2013 Rings Scores






Last year, The All Around created some handy dandy rankings, leading up to the Olympics. This year, not so much. So, I've decided to create the UTRS (Uncle Tim Ranking System), which, for those who care, is pronounced "uterus." Think of my ranking system as a surrogate until The All Around steps in and takes over.

As per usual, take these rankings with a grain of salt. (Pro Tip: Never bet your life savings based on my numbers–or my predictions for that matter.) Judging varies from meet to meet, and as you can see, I've culled these scores from several meets. I've included the competition names so that you can decide how much crack the judges smoked before handing out the scores.

More than anything, you should think of these tables like this: New quad, new Code of Points. What the H is a good score nowadays? Well, let me show you…

(Updated: May 26, 2013)



Men's Rings Rankings: Best D Scores


Name Country D-Score Meet
1. Eleftherios Petrounias Greece 7.0 European Championships
2. Brandon Wynn USA 6.9 Cottbus
2. Aleksandr Balandin Russia 6.9 French International
2. Lambertus van Gelder Netherlands 6.9 Cottbus
5. Samir Ait Said France 6.8 European Championships
5. Ri Se Gwang North Korea 6.8 Doha
7. Igor Radivilov Ukraine 6.7 European Championships
7. Denis Ablyazin Russia 6.7 European Championships
7. Matteo Morandi Italy 6.7 European Championships
7. Danny Pinheiro-Rodrigues France 6.7 European Championships
7. Arthur Nabarette Brazil 6.7 Doha
7. Liao Qiuhua China 6.7 Doha
7. Henrique Medina Brazil 6.7 Doha
7. Kim Jin Hyok North Korea 6.7 Doha
7. Liu Yang China 6.7 Cottbus
7. Tommy Ramos Puerto Rico 6.7 Cottbus
7. You Hao China 6.7 Cottbus
7. Federico Molinari Argentina 6.7 French International


Thursday, May 23, 2013

UTRS: 2013 Uneven Bar Scores



Last year, The All Around created some handy dandy rankings, leading up to the Olympics. This year, not so much. So, I've decided to create the UTRS (Uncle Tim Ranking System), which, for those who care, is pronounced "uterus." Think of my ranking system as a surrogate until The All Around steps in and takes over.

As per usual, take these rankings with a grain of salt. (Pro Tip: Never bet your life savings based on my numbers–or my predictions for that matter.) Judging varies from meet to meet, and as you can see, I've culled these scores from several meets. I've included the competition names so that you can decide how much crack the judges smoked before handing out the scores.

More than anything, you should think of these tables like this: New quad, new Code of Points. What the H is a good score nowadays? Well, let me show you…

(Updated: May 26, 2013)


Women's Uneven Bar Rankings: Best D Scores


Name Country D-Score Meet
1. He Kexin China 6.8 Chinese Nationals
2. Shang Chungsong China 6.7 Chinese Nationals
3. Tan Jiaxin China 6.6 Doha
3. Huang Huidan China 6.6 Chinese Nationals
5. Yao Jinnan China 6.5 Chinese Nationals
6. Kyla Ross USA 6.4 GER-ROU-USA Friendly
6. Wu Liufang China 6.4 Chinese Nationals
8. Fan Yilin China 6.3 Chinese Nationals
8. Xiao Kangjun China 6.3 Chinese Nationals
8. Aliya Mustafina Russia 6.3 European Championships
8. Sophie Scheder Germany 6.3 GER-ROU-USA Friendly
8. Ruby Harrold Great Britain 6.3 Doha
8. Becky Downie Great Britain 6.3 British Championships
14. Huang Qiushuang China 6.2 Tokyo World Cup
14. Yelena Vasilyeva Ukraine 6.2 Zakharova Cup
14. Katelyn Ohashi USA 6.2 American Cup

How long until Chinese bar workers become mercenaries and start competing for other countries for pay?

P.S. It should be noted that, at this point in the quad, many gymnasts are inconsistent or playing with new routines. As a result, an individual's D score on bars can vary from week to week. Though some gymnasts perform the same routine almost every time (e.g. Mustafina), many like Tan Jiaxin will perform a 6.6 routine one week and a 5.9 another.



Wednesday, May 22, 2013

UTRS: 2013 Pommel Horse Scores





(This post is dedicated to one Mr. Tim Daggett, the man who won the bronze medal on pommel horse at the 1984 Olympics. Happy birthday, buddy!)



Last year, The All Around created some handy dandy rankings, leading up to the Olympics. This year, not so much. So, I've decided to create the UTRS (Uncle Tim Ranking System), which, for those who care, is pronounced "uterus." Think of my ranking system as a surrogate until The All Around steps in and takes over.

As per usual, take these rankings with a grain of salt. (Pro Tip: Never bet your life savings based on my numbers–or my predictions for that matter.) Judging varies from meet to meet, and as you can see, I've culled these scores from several meets. I've included the competition names so that you can decide how much crack the judges smoked before handing out the scores.

More than anything, you should think of these tables like this: New quad, new Code of Points. What the H is a good score nowadays? Well, let me show you…

(Updated: May 26, 2013)



Men's Pommel Rankings: Best D Scores

Name Country D-Score Meet
1. Prashanth Sellathurai Australia 6.9 Doha
2. Oleg Verniaiev Ukraine 6.7 American Cup
2. Oleg Stepko Ukraine 6.7 European Championships
2. Max Whitlock Great Britain 6.7 European Championships
2. Matvei Petrov Russia 6.7 European Championships
2. Kristzian Berki Hungary 6.7 European Championships
2. Daniel Keatings Great Britain 6.7 European Championships
2. Alexander Naddour USA 6.7 Ljubljana
2. Alberto Busnari Italy 6.7 European Championships
10. Zoltan Kallai Hungary 6.6 Ljubljana
10. Luke Stannard (USA) 6.6 Winter Cup
10. Jossimar Calvo Moreno Colombia 6.6 Ljubljana
10. Flavius Koczi Romania 6.6 European Championships
10. Donna Donny Truyens Belgium 6.6 European Championships


Tuesday, May 21, 2013

UTRS: 2013 WAG Vault Scores


Last year, The All Around created some handy dandy rankings, leading up to the Olympics. This year, not so much. So, I've decided to create the UTRS (Uncle Tim Ranking System), which, for those who care, is pronounced "uterus." Think of my ranking system as a surrogate until The All Around steps in and takes over. (Seriously, whenever you want to take over… Any day now!)

As per usual, take these rankings with a grain of salt. (Pro Tip: Never bet your life savings based on my numbers–or my predictions for that matter.) Judging varies from meet to meet, and as you can see, I've culled these scores from several meets. I've included the competition names so that you can decide how much crack the judges smoked before handing out the scores.

More than anything, you should think of these tables like this: New quad, new Code of Points. What the H is a good score nowadays? Well, let me show you…



Women's Vault Rankings: Best D Score Averages
In other words, who has the most scoring potential? 


Name Country D 1 D 2 D Avg. Meet
1. Fadwa Mohamed Egypt 7.0 5.2 6.1 Ljubljana
1. Ri Un Ha North Korea 5.8 6.4 6.1 Doha
3. Phan Thi Ha Thanh Vietnam 5.8 6.2 6.0 Doha
4. Simone Biles USA 6.3 5.6 5.95 Jesolo
4. Maria Paseka Russia 6.3 5.6 5.95 Europeans
6. Alexa Moreno Medina* Mexico 6.2 5.5 5.85 French International
7. Giulia Steingruber Switzerland 6.2 5.2 5.7 Europeans
8. Oksana Chusovitina Uzbekistan 5.8 5.5 5.65 Cottbus
9. Ellie Black Canada 5.8 5.2 5.5 Ljubljana
9. Larisa Iordache Romania 5.8 5.2 5.5 Europeans
9. Hong Un Jong North Korea 5.8 5.2 5.5 Doha
9. Noel Van Klaveren Netherlands 5.8 5.2 5.5 Europeans

*Interpretation of the French International Qualifications score sheet? Anyone?



Monday, May 20, 2013

UTRS: 2013 MAG Floor Scores


Last year, The All Around created some handy dandy rankings, leading up to the Olympics. This year, not so much. So, I've decided to create the UTRS (Uncle Tim Ranking System), which, for those who care, is pronounced "uterus." Think of my ranking system as a surrogate until The All Around steps in and takes over.

As per usual, take these rankings with a grain of salt. (Pro Tip: Never bet your life savings based on my numbers–or my predictions for that matter.) Judging varies from meet to meet, and as you can see, I've culled these scores from several meets. I've included the competition names so that you can decide how much crack the judges smoked before handing out the scores.

More than anything, you should think of these tables like this: New quad, new Code of Points. What the H is a good score nowadays? Well, let me show you…

(Updated: June 4, 2013–Videos from Chinese Nationals are slowly popping up…)

Men's Floor Rankings: Best D Scores


Name Country D-Score Meet
1. Shirai Kenzo
(白井健三)
Japan 7.3 Japanese Nationals
2. Denis Ablyazin Russia 7.0 European Championships
2. Flavius Koczi Romania 7.0 European Championships
4. Ryohei Kato Japan 6.8 Tokyo World Cup
5. Oleg Verniaiev Ukraine 6.7 Tokyo World Cup
5. Sergio Sasaki Brazil 6.7 Tokyo World Cup
5. Kohei Uchimura
(内村航平)
Japan 6.7 Japanese Nationals
8. Max Whitlock Great Britain 6.6 European Championships
8. Matthias Fahrig Germany 6.6 European Championships
8. Jeffrey Wammes Netherlands 6.6 European Championships
8. Paul Ruggeri USA 6.6 Winter Cup
12. David Belyavskiy Russia 6.5 European Championships
12. Alexander Shatilov Israel 6.5 European Championships
12. Daniel Purvis Great Britain 6.5 European Championships
12. Eleftherios Kosmidis Greece 6.5 European Championships
12. Vlad Bogdan Cotuna Romania 6.5 European Championships
12. Jake Dalton USA 6.5 Cottbus
12. Arthur Oyakawa Brazil 6.5 Cottbus
12. Trevor Howard (USA) 6.5 Winter Cup
12. Stacey Ervin (USA) 6.5 Winter Cup
12. Eddie Penev USA 6.5 Winter Cup
12. Deng Shudi China 6.5 Chinese Nationals
12. Deng Shudi China 6.5 Chinese Nationals
12. Zhou Shixiong China 6.5 Chinese Nationals


Saturday, May 18, 2013

UTRS: 2013 WAG & MAG All-Around Scores


Simone's high score from the Jesolo all-around competition came on vault–a 15.900
 
Last year, The All Around created some handy dandy rankings, leading up to the Olympics. This year, not so much. So, I've decided to create the UTRS (Uncle Tim Ranking System), which, for those who care, is pronounced "uterus." Think of my ranking system as a surrogate until The All Around steps in and takes over.

As per usual, take these rankings with a grain of salt. (Pro Tip: Never bet your life savings based on my numbers–or my predictions for that matter.) Judging varies from meet to meet, and as you can see, I've culled these scores from several meets. I've included the competition names so that you can decide how much crack the judges smoked before handing out the scores.

More than anything, you should think of these tables like this: New quad, new Code of Points. What the H is a good score nowadays? Well, let me show you…

(Updated: May 26, 2013)

Women's All-Around Rankings: Best Scores

Name Country Score Meet
1. Simone Biles USA 60.400 Jesolo
2. Aliya Mustafina Russia 59.850 Russian Nationals
3. Kyla Ross USA 59.300 GER-ROU-USA Friendly Meet
4. Katelyn Ohashi USA 59.199 American Cup
5. Larisa Iordache Romania 58.432 European Championships
6. Peyton Ernst USA 58.000 GER-ROU-USA Friendly Meet
7. Anastasia Grishina Russia 57.932 European Championships
8. Yao Jinnan China 57.468 Chinese Nationals
9. Victoria Moors Canada 57.400 Comaneci International
10. Yevgenia Shelgunova Russia 57.250 Russian Nationals
11. Diana Bulimar Romania 57.065 European Championships
11. Giulia Steingruber Switzerland 57.065 European Championships
13. Ksenia Afanasyeva Russia 56.850 Russian Nationals
14. Asuka Teramoto Japan 56.825 Tokyo World Cup
15. Jessica Lopez Colombia 56.800 Comaneci International



Tuesday, May 7, 2013

An Idiot's Guide to Bruno Grandi's May 7th Letter

Today, there's been a lot of brouhaha about Bruno Grandi's latest newsletter. Unfortunately, most people don't understand what the tuck he's saying. So, let's break it down and then discuss, shall we?

The letter begins with an exclamation:

"Culture!"
Well, someone's excited, isn't he? I'm just picturing Bruno Grandi yelling, "CULTURE!" from the top of the Swiss Alps.

He then continues…


"[Culture] is an old term, which has always been used, but rarely with its appropriate and specific meaning."


I just rolled my eyes so hard that I saw my brain. Is the pontification really necessary?


Friday, May 3, 2013

Oleg Verniaiev Recapped: The All-Around at the 2013 EuropeanChampionships



In case you missed the European Championships, here are the results:


  1. David Belyavskiy, Russia– 89.799
  2. Max Whitlock, Great Britain– 89.106
  3. Oleg Verniaiev, Ukraine– 88.398
  4. Oleg Stepko, Ukraine– 88.098
  5. Daniel Purvis, Great Britain– 86.732

And here is part of my recap of the all-around final. (You can find links to the rest at the bottom of the page.)


3. Oleg Verniaiev


HOLY TRAMP-OLY! Oleg Verniaiev sure gets around, doesn't he?

Since the beginning of March, Oleg has competed in the American Cup, the Internationaux de France, the Zakharova Cup, the Tokyo Cup, and now the European Championships.

Unfortunately, the fatigue of so many competitions affected Oleg's performance at the European Championships. His very first routine of the all-around finals looked somewhat laden. Sure, his rings routine has some impressive strength parts. He opens with an Azarian roll to a Maltese and an uprise to a Maltese into an iron cross--a sequence that neither Belyavskiy nor Whitlock can do. But his body positions were not as precise as they usually are. His feet were too low on his first Maltese, and his shoulders were much too low on his iron cross. Later in the routine, his shoulders rose way too high on his "whip it" cross, and on his full-twisting double layout dismount, he took a rather sizable step back.

While Oleg's 14.733 was the highest rings score of the all-around finals, it was his lowest rings score of the 2013 season. (At the Tokyo Cup and the Zakharova Cup, he broke the 15 mark on rings.)

We quickly forgot about that misstep when Oleg rotated to vault where he totally DRAGULATED his competition!
This is not a good look for Oleg…


Wednesday, May 1, 2013

Max Whitlock Recapped: The All-Around at the 2013 European Championships

Let me refresh your memory. Since there isn't another major meet until the 2016 Rio Olympics…


I've decided to do a thorough recap of the all-around competition at the European Championships. On Monday, we discussed (and maybe drooled over) David Belyavskiy, and today, it's Max Whitlock's turn. As you might recall, he finished second behind David and ahead of Ukraine's Oleg Verniaiev.

 

2. Max Whitlock


Max Whitlock waddled his way into the all-around final by performing a pike-open Yurchenko 2.5
into a duck walk…
Or maybe he genuflected into a "Tebow." (I'm not "straight enough" to understand American football references.) At any rate, his vault wasn't cute, and Max received a 14.433, while his major competitors were scoring in the 15.4/15.5 range.