Thursday, October 10, 2013

2013 World Championships by the Numbers: The Dudes


Well, the World Championships are over, and you're probably wondering what to do with your life. By now, you have rewatched the finals at least twice. You have memorized Sam Mikulak's choreography. You have e-mailed Steve Butcher your 100-page master's thesis on the judging at Worlds. (You included your personal execution scores for each routine, of course, because you, as a couch judge, clearly know far more than any judge from Antarctica.) You have vowed to get back in the gym so that your body bears some semblance of your former gymnastics self. You have thought about starting a gymnastics blog, but ultimately, you decided you like sleep, the gym, and/or your social life more.

So, what is there left to do? Look at the numbers. Duh. Let's look at the guys whom the judges thought squeezed their butts the tightest (among other things).



Execution Averages During All-Around Finals


Name
Execution Average
Execution Rank
All-Around Rank
Kohei Uchimura
8.982
1
1
Ryohei Kato
8.772
2
2
Fabian Hambuechen
8.705
3
3
Andrey Likhovitskiy
8.671
4
8
Max Whitlock
8.655
5
4
Daniel Purvis
8.584
6
7
Sam Mikulak
8.525
7
6
Oliver Hegi
8.511
8
23
Casimir Schmidt
8.501
9
18
Fabian Gonzalez
8.494
10
11
Sergio Sasaki
8.475
11
5
Pablo Braeger
8.461
12
16
Arnaud Willig
8.415
13
13
Arthur Oyakawa Mariano
8.323
14
17
Gustavo Palma Simões
8.300
15
19
Lin Chaopan
8.239
16
9
Bart Deurloo
8.222
17
14
Nestor Abad
8.182
18
20
David Belyavskiy
8.162
19
12
Zhou Shixiong
8.155
20
10
Angel Ramos
7.994
21
21
Oleg Verniaiev
7.828
22
15
Park Minsoo
7.666
23
22
*Neutral deductions for going out-of-bounds on floor and vault are factored into the execution scores.


Commentary:

1. Contrary to popular belief, men's gymnastics isn't just about chucking horrific and highly valued skills. Execution actually matters. In fact, it mattered a lot in the all-around final. The top three gymnasts were the best executioners.

2. Oh, Oleg. He has the best toe point in the business, but the worst mental game. Maybe he needs a trip to the Ranch to meet the formidable Marta Karolyi. Maybe she can scare him into living up to his potential.

3. I repeat myself: Sergio Sasaki, for the love of Nemov, clean up your form! I beg you! You could be even better than you are right now! (If you can't tell, I want, like, a 10-way tie for first next year.)

4. On GymCastic last October, I talked about Andrey Likhovitskiy. In short, if you like clean, simple gymnastics, he's your man. Unfortunately, I doubt that, at the age of 27, he will ever upgrade to the point that he will place in the top 5 at a World Championships or Olympic Games, but he certainly is beautiful to watch. (I also think he looks a little like Oksana Chusovitina's cousin.)

Which brings me to my next table…



We have to look at the hardness of the D. Warning: If you are a Max Whitlock fan, you might not want to look at this table.

Difficulty Scores During All-Around Finals

Name
Difficulty Total
Difficulty Average
Difficulty Rank
All-Around Rank
Oleg Verniaiev
38.7
6.450
1
15
Kohei Uchimura
38.1
6.350
2
1
Sergio Sasaki
38.1
6.350
2
5
Zhou Shixiong
37.7
6.283
4
10
Lin Chaopan
37.4
6.233
5
9
Ryohei Kato
37.4
6.233
5
2
David Belyavskiy
37.3
6.217
7
12
Fabian Hambuechen
37.1
6.183
8
3
Max Whitlock
37.1
6.183
8
4
Daniel Purvis
36.6
6.100
10
7
Bart Deurloo
36.4
6.067
11
14
Sam Mikulak
36.4
6.067
11
6
Arnaud Willig
35.5
5.912
13
13
Andrey Likhovitskiy
35.4
5.900
14
8
Fabian Gonzalez
35.4
5.900
14
11
Arthur Oyakawa Mariano
35.2
5.867
16
17
Park Minsoo
34.9
5.817
17
22
Pablo Braeger
34.5
5.750
18
16
Nestor Abad
34.0
5.667
19
20
Gustavo Palma Simões
33.5
5.583
20
19
Casimir Schmidt
33.2
5.533
21
18
Angel Ramos
33.0
5.500
22
21
Oliver Hegi
31.1
5.1833
23
23

Commentary:

1. If I were Max Whitlock, I'd be kicking myself. Both he and Fabian Hambuechen had the same difficulty level, but Fabian out-executed him. That Fokin sucks. It's time to start praying at the altar of Nemov, and it's time to start studying tapes of Kohei Uchimura, Kyla Ross, and any gymnast in the history of gymnastics with good execution.

2. While we are on the topic of Great Britain, I have to give credit to Daniel Purvis. He has put effort into upgrading his weaker events. At the Tokyo World Cup in April, he competed a 6.1 pommel routine; at Worlds, he competed a 6.2 routine. During the Tokyo World Cup in April, he competed a 6.3 parallel bar routine; at Worlds, he competed a 6.5 routine. But the place where Danny really needs to work is high bar. His difficulty score is only a 5.9. He needed to learn another release, like, yesterday. Right now, his only release is Yamawaki, and well, that skill's about as exciting as Aliya Mustafina's flight series on beam. Since he's such a good front tumbler, maybe he could learn a Jaeger or maybe a Gaylord I? Thoughts? I want to see him with at least a 6.3 high bar routine next year.

3. Largely because of Zou Kai, the Chinese men have a reputation of being sloppy gymnasts, and with this new batch of Chinese gymnasts, it's unclear whether they will follow in Zou Kai's footsteps or not. As you can see from the chart above, both Zhou Shixiong and Lin Chaopan clearly have sizable Ds, but do they know how to use them? Take Lin Chaopan, for instance. During event finals, Lin Chaopan tied Kohei Uchimura's execution score on parallel bars, so it seems like the potential for beautiful gymnastics is there. During all-around finals, however, he scored an 8.400 on parallel bars, and his best execution scores were an 8.666 on floor and pommel horse. That's roughly 0.3 below Kohei Uchimura's average across all six events.


For those who would like to geek out a bit more, here are the averages for all the men in the all-around final:
Averages during the All-Around Finals in Antwerp

EventAvg. D ScoreAvg. E ScoreAvg. Score
Floor
6.209 (1)
8.559 (2)
14.770 (1)
Pommel horse
5.896 (4)
7.824 (6)
13.728 (6)
Rings
5.783 (5)
8.492 (3)
14.275 (4)
Vault
5.565 (6)
8.953 (1)
14.562 (2)
Parallel Bars
6.165 (3)
8.377 (4)
14.542 (3)
High Bar
6.209 (1)
8.095 (5)
14.195 (5)
Jossimar Calvo Moreno's scores are not factored into this table. I didn't include him because he didn't compete on all 6 events.


And if you only care about the top 50%, here are the average scores for the top 12 in the all-around competition:

Averages for the Top 12 in Antwerp

EventAvg. D ScoreAvg. E ScoreAvg. Score
Floor
6.350 (3)
8.655 (2)
15.007 (1)
Pommel horse
6.167 (4)
8.263 (5)
14.446 (6)
Rings
5.850 (5)
8.626 (3)
14.476 (5)
Vault
5.700 (6)
9.017 (1)
14.800 (3)
Parallel Bars
6.375 (2)
8.536 (4)
14.911 (2)
High Bar
6.558 (1)
8.114 (6)
14.671 (4)

To give you a point of comparison, here's what the table looked like last year during the all-around final at the Olympics. (This is for all the competitors--not just the top 50%):

Averages during the All-Around Final in London in 2012 

EventAvg. D ScoreAvg. E ScoreAvg. Score
Floor
6.008 (4)
8.497 (4)
14.490 (5)
Pommel horse
5.675 (6)
8.312 (5)
13.987 (6)
Rings
5.896 (5)
8.749 (2)
14.645 (3)
Vault
6.433 (1)
9.084 (1)
15.489 (1)
Parallel Bars
6.229 (3)
8.735 (3)
14.964 (2)
High Bar
6.386 (2)
8.187 (6)
14.589 (4)
Random Fact: At the 2012 Olympics, Danell Leyva out-executed Kohei Uchimura during the all-around final.

In other words, under the old Code of Points, vault was the highest scoring event--by a long shot. Let's talk about this…

Commentary: 

1. Scoring parity was one of the unexpressed goals of the new Code of Points. It looks like the Men's Technical Committee did a pretty good job of doing that. For the all-arounders, the scores are pretty even across all six events.

2. Men's floor went from being one of the lowest scoring events to being one of the highest scoring events. As the quad carries on, we will have to see if this continues. Perhaps the FIG will crack down harder on execution scores? Or perhaps the gymnasts will start upping their game on the other events? We shall see. The guys have 3 more years to find the code-whoring loopholes.

3. After the FIG devalued most vaults by a full point, some men's gymnastics fans were outraged. The blowhards thought that vault would become the lowest scoring event. Well, that didn't happen. Men's vault may not be the highest scoring event anymore, but it certainly is not the lowest. During the all-around final in Antwerp, that claim to fame belonged to pommel horse (and and that claim to fame probably always will belong to pommel horse).

That said, I recognize that the highest score on vault wasn't quite as high as the highest scores on the other events. Here's a mini-UTRS to help you out…

The Best Scores in Antwerp

Event
Gymnast
Score
Competition
All-Around
Kohei Uchimura
91.990
All-Around Finals
Floor
Shirai Kenzo
16.233
Prelims
Pommel Horse
Kohei Kameyama
15.833
Event Finals
Rings
Liu Yang
15.866
Prelims
Single Vault
Yang Hak-Seon
15.733
Event Finals
Vault Average
Yang Hak-Seon
15.533
Event Finals
Parallel Bars
Vasileios Tsolakidis
15.866
Prelims
High Bar
Epke Zonderland
16.000
Event Finals

Quick and Dirty Commentary:

At the end of the day, the youngest competitor in Antwerp, Shirai Kenzo, posted the highest score on any event, but the title of hardest D still belongs to Mr. Epke Zonderland with his 7.7.


Here's the final medal count for the men:


2 comments:

  1. I don't think the average D Score on VT should be a 6.433 (top 50% table).

    ReplyDelete
  2. That number is from the all-around finals at the 2012 Olympics where they used the old vault tables. This year, the average D score is 5.700 for the top 50%.

    ReplyDelete